<html><head><link rel="shortcut icon" href="favicon.ico" type="x-icon" /> <title>Colin P. Laroque Webpage</title> </head> <body style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); COLOR: rgb(0,0,0)" repeat="no"><a name="top"></a> <center> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <table cellspacing="2" width="640" border="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="12">&nbsp;</td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="12"> <div align="center"><img style="FLOAT: left" height="181" hspace="45" src="colin.jpg" width=200 vspace=15><br><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=4><strong>Colin P. Laroque</strong></font></div> <p align="center"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2>Room 5C10, Agriculture Building<br><a href="http://www.usask.ca/"> University of Saskatchewan</a><br>51 Campus Drive<br>Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 <br><strong>tel.</strong> 306-966-2493<br><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">fax.</span> 306-966-6881<br><strong>email</strong> <a href="mailto:colin.laroque@usask.ca">Colin.Laroque@usask.ca</a> </font></p> <p align="center"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><br></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color=#660000 size=2><strong><br></strong></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><br></font></p> <div align="center"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color=#660000 size=2 ></font>&nbsp;</div></td></tr> <tr> <td width="60"></td> <td width="220" bgcolor="#ffffff" height="27"> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color=#660000 size=2><strong>&middot; </strong><a href="#deg">Degrees</a></font></div> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color=#660000 size=2><strong>&middot; </strong><a href="#aff">Affiliations</a></font><a href="#aff">&nbsp;<font face="Verdana" size=2>and Funding</font></a><br><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color=#660000 size=2><strong><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color=#660000 size=2><strong></strong></font>&middot; </strong></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><a href="#teaching">Teaching</a></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color=#660000 size=2><strong><br>&middot;</strong></font> <font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><a href="#researchinterests">Research Interests</a></font></div></td> <td width="400" bgcolor="#ffffff" height="27"> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana" color="#660000" size=2><strong>&middot;</strong><a href="#pub" ><font face="Times New Roman" size=3></font> </a><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><a href="#refereedpublications">Refereed<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2> Publications</font></a></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color=#000000 size=2>&nbsp;</font></font></div> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana" color="#660000" size=2><strong>&middot;</strong></font> <font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><a href="#theses">Theses</a></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2> <br></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color=#660000 size=2><strong>&middot;</strong></font> <font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><a href="#conf">Conference presentations</a></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2> <br></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color=#660000 size=2><strong>&middot; <a href="http://www.mta.ca/madlab/"></a></strong><a href="http://www.madlabsk.ca">MAD Lab</a><strong></strong></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2> </font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2></font></div></td> <td width="10"></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"> <div align="left"> <hr width="500"> </div></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"> <p align="center"><img height="287" src="lake.jpg" width=435></p> <p align="center"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2>Sunwapta Lake research site</font></p></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"> <hr width="500"> </td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"><b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><a name=deg></a></font></b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><font size="3"><strong>Degrees </strong></font></font><font size=3>&nbsp;</font></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"> <p align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><br>Ph.D., University of Victoria, 2002<br>M.Sc., University of Victoria, 1995<br>B.Sc., University of Saskatchewan, 1993</font></p> <p align="right"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><a href="#top">Back to Top</a></font></p></td></tr> <tr> <td width="300" bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="2" height="27"><b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><a name=aff></a></font></b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><font size="3"><strong>Affiliations</strong></font></font><font size=3>&nbsp;</font></td></tr> <tr> <td width="300" bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="2" height="27"> <p align="left"><a href="http://www.candendro.ca"><font face=Verdana size=2>CanDendro</font></a><font face="Verdana" size="2"> <br></font><a href="http://www.treeringsociety.org/"><font face="Verdana" size=2>Tree Ring Society</font> </a><font face="Verdana" size=2><br></font><a href="http://www.cag-acg.ca/en/"><font face="Verdana" size=2>Canadian Association of Geographers</font> </a><br><a href="http://cgrg.geog.uvic.ca/"><font face="Verdana" size="2">Canadian Geomorphological Research Group </font></a><br> <p align="left"></p> <p align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><b>Funding Agencies</b></font></p><strong><font face="Verdana" size=2></font></strong><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2></font> <p align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><a href="http://www.nserc.ca/guide/c7_e.htm">NSERC UFA<br></a><a href="http://www.nserc.ca/index.htm">NSERC RTI <br><br></a> </td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"><b><a name="teaching"></a></b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=3><strong>Teaching Evaluations</strong></font><strong><font size="3"></font></strong></td></tr> <tr> <td class="td6" valign="middle" colspan="6"> <p class="p12">GENS 1401 - The Physical Environment - <br>[<a href="http://www.mta.ca/faculty/socsci/geograph/1401-2012-ranked.pdf" >2012 Evaluation Scores = 0 low, 5 high</a>]&nbsp; [<a href="1401-2012-written.pdf" >2012 Evaluation Written Feedback</a>]</p>[<a href="1401-2011-ranked.pdf" >2011 Evaluation Scores = 0 low, 5 high</a>]&nbsp; [<a href="1401-2011-written.pdf" >2011 Evaluation Written Feedback</a>]</p> <p class="p12">GENS 2411 - Geomorphology - <br> [<a href="2411-2013-ranked.pdf" >2013 Evaluation Scores = 0 low, 5 high</a>]&nbsp; [<a href="2411-2013-written.pdf" >2013 Evaluation Written Feedback</a>]</p>[<a href="2411-2012-ranked.pdf" >2012 Evaluation Scores = 0 low, 5 high</a>]&nbsp; [<a href="2411-2012-written.pdf" >2012 Evaluation Written Feedback</a>]</p>[<a href="2411-2011-ranked.pdf" >2011 Evaluation Scores = 0 low, 5 high</a>]&nbsp; [<a href="2411-2011-written.pdf" >2011 Evaluation Written Feedback</a>] <p></p> <p class="p12">GENS 2421 - Weather and Climate - <br>[<a href="2421-2012-ranked.pdf" >2012 Evaluation Scores = 0 low, 5 high</a>]&nbsp; [<a href="2421-2012-written.pdf" >2012 Evaluation Written Feedback</a>]</p> [<a href="2421-2011-ranked.pdf" >2011 Evaluation Scores = 0 low, 5 high</a>]&nbsp; [<a href="2421-2011-written.pdf" >2011 Evaluation Written Feedback</a>] <p></p> <p class="p12">GENS 3401 - Research Methods in Environmental Science - &nbsp;<br>[<a href="3401-2013-written.pdf" >2013 Evaluation Written Feedback</a>]</p> [<a href="3401-2012-written.pdf" >2012 Evaluation Written Feedback</a>]</p>[<a href="3401-2011-written.pdf" >2011 Evaluation Written Feedback</a>]</p>[<a href="3401-2010-written.pdf" >2010 Evaluation Written Feedback</a>]</p> <p></p> <p align="right"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><a href="#top">Back to Top</a></font></p></td></tr> <p><br><br><p><br></p> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"><br><strong>&nbsp;<a name=researchinterests></a><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=3>Research Interests</font> </strong></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"> <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2 ></font>&nbsp;</p> <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">My research interests focus on past and future climates in Canada, especially on how they relate to dynamic ecosystem and geomorpholgical processes. My specialization is dendrochronology (tree-ring analysis) and I use dendrochronological techniques to gain an understanding about past climates, past glacier activity and extent, past ecosystem dynamics, and even past human activities through dendroarchaeological and dendrochemical investigations. </font></p> <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">I began my research career in 1991 studying glacial activity in the Kananaskis Front Ranges region of southwestern Alberta, and have continued my field studies in every year since. I have studied in many alpine regions including the Insular Mountain range of Vancouver Island, the Coastal Mountains of British Columbia, and in many areas of the Monashee, Selkirk, Purcell, and Main Ranges of the Canadian Rocky Mountains in British Columbia and Alberta. </font></p> <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">From 1995 to 2003 I was closely associated with the University of Victoria Tree-Ring Laboratory <a href="http://www.geog.uvic.ca/dept/uvtrl/uvtrl.htm" >(UVTRL)</a> in the Department of Geography at the University of Victoria. I have completed my two postgraduate degrees through the UVTRL, and have been involved in a number of other projects under the auspices of the lab. <br></font></p> <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">In the fall of 2003 I moved to Mount Allison University, where I have set up the first dendrochronology laboratory in Atlantic Canada.&nbsp; The Mount Allison Dendrochronology Lab (<a href="http://www.mta.ca/madlab/">MAD Lab</a>) was formed in January of 2004 and has concentrated its research efforts in the 4 Atlantic Canadian provinces. The future looks very positive as we have already initiated dendroclimatological, dendroarchaeological, dendrogeomorphological and dendroecological investigations.&nbsp; I urge you to visit the <a href="http://www.mta.ca/madlab/">MAD Lab</a> website to see what we are curently up to. I am also the webmaster for the <a href="http://www.mta.ca/candendro/index.htm" >CanDendro</a> group. Please feel free to check out the website to see links to dendrochronological sites in <a href="http://www.mta.ca/candendro/google.htm">Canada</a>,the Canadian bibliographic <a href="http://cgrg.geog.uvic.ca/cgi-bin/cdsearch.cgi" >database</a>, or simplyto find links to <a href="http://www.mta.ca/candendro/contact.htm" >dendrochronologists</a> in Canada.</font></p> <p align="right"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><a href="#top">Back to Top</a> </font></p></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2>&nbsp;<strong><a name=refereedpublications></a><font size="3">Refereed Publications </font></strong></font>&nbsp;</td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"> <ul> <p></p> <li> <p align="left"><font size="2"><font face="Verdana">Davis, E.L., <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong>, and Van Rees, K., 2013. Evaluating the suitability of nine shlterbelt species for dendrochronoligcal purposes in the Canadian Prairies. Agroforestry Systems, 87:713-727.</font></font><br>[<a href="#abs32" ><font size=2><font face="Verdana">View abstract</font> </font></a><font face=Verdana size=2>]</font>[<font face=Verdana size=2><a href="davisetal_2013_shelterbelts.pdf">Download paper</a></font>] </p> <li> <p align="left"><font size="2"><font face="Verdana">Anderson, F., Brunt, J., Cameron, R., Caverhill, B., Clapp, D., Clapp, H., Coulthard, B., Hart, S., Helmer, L., Hubley, S., Hurlburt, D., Imlay, T., Jameson, R., Kidd, P., <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong>, Marotte, R., Marshall, K., Mitchell, S.C., Neily, T., Nickerson, K., O'Neill, N., Phillips, B., Pross, C., Proulx, G., Reardon, C., Todd, J., and Towers, J., 2012. Bioblitz of the Lake Rossignal Wilderness Area. Proceedings of the Nova Scotian Instutute of Science, 47:33-57.</font></font><br>[<a href="#abs31" ><font size=2><font face="Verdana">View abstract</font> </font></a><font face=Verdana size=2>]</font>[<font face=Verdana size=2><a href="Anderson-PRN.pdf">Download paper</a></font>] </p> <li> <p align="left"><font size="2"><font face="Verdana">Kershaw, G.G.L., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong>, 2012. The dendroclimatological potential of White Birch (<i>Betula papyrifera</i>) in Labrador, Canada. The Northeastern Geographer, 4:28-38.</font></font><br>[<a href="#abs30" ><font size=2><font face="Verdana">View abstract</font> </font></a><font face=Verdana size=2>]</font>[<font face=Verdana size=2><a href="kershaw-paper-cut.pdf">Download paper</a></font>] </p> <li> <p align="left"><font size="2"><font face="Verdana">Hart, S.J., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong>, 2012. Searching for thresholds in climate-radial growth relationships of Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir, Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada. Dendrochronologia, 31:9-15.</font></font><br>[<a href="#abs29" ><font size=2><font face="Verdana">View abstract</font> </font></a><font face=Verdana size=2>]</font>[<a href="krusty.pdf" ><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a>] </p> <li> <p align="left"><font size="2"><font face="Verdana">Trindade, M., Bell, T., <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong>, Jacobs, J.D., and Hermanutz, L., 2011. Dendroclimatic response of a coastal alpine treeline: a multispecies perspective from Labrador. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 41: 469-478.</font></font><br>[<a href="#abs28" ><font size=2><font face="Verdana">View abstract</font> </font></a><font face=Verdana size=2>]</font>[<a href="MMMM.pdf" ><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a>] </p> <li> <p align="left"><font size="2"><font face="Verdana">Nelson, T.A, <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong>, and&nbsp;Smith D.J., 2011.&nbsp;Detecting spatial connections within a dendrochronological network on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Dendrochronologia, 29:49-54</font></font>.<br>[<a href="#abs25" ><font size=2><font face="Verdana">View abstract</font> </font></a><font face=Verdana size=2>]</font>[<a href="vi-space.pdf" ><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a>] </p> <li> <font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"></font> <p align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><font size=2>Trindade, M.,&nbsp;Bell, T.,&nbsp;<strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong>&nbsp;2011. Changing climatic sensitivities of two spruce species across a moisture gradient in Northeastern Canada. Dendrochronologia, 29:25-30</font></font><font size="2">.<br><font face=Verdana>[</font></font><a href="#abs24" ><font face=Verdana size=2>View abstract</font></a><font size="2"><font face=Verdana>]</font> </font>[<a href="2spruce.pdf" ><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a>]</p> <li> <p align="left"><font size="2"><font face="Verdana">Pickard, F.D.,&nbsp;Robichaud, A.,&nbsp;and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2011. Using dendrochronology to date the Val Comeau canoe, New Brunswick and developing an eastern white pine chronology in the Canadian Maritimes. Dendrochronologia, 29:3-8.</font></font><br><font face=Verdana>[</font><a href="#abs23" ><font face=Verdana size=2>View abstract</font></a><font face="Verdana" size=2>]</font>[<a href="canoe.pdf" ><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a>]</p> <li> <p align="left"><font size="2"><font face="Verdana">MacDonald, H.C., <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong>,&nbsp;Fleming, D.E.B. and&nbsp;Gherase, M.R., 2011. Dendroanalysis of metal pollution from the Sydney Steel Plant in Sydney, Nova Scotia. Dendrochronologia, 29:9-15</font></font>. <br><font face="Verdana">[</font><a href="#abs22" ><font face=Verdana size=2>View abstract</font></a><font size="2"><font face=Verdana>]</font> </font>[<a href="xrf.pdf" ><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a>]</p> <li> <p align="left"><font size="2"><font face="Verdana">Nishimura, P.H.,&nbsp;and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2011. Observed continentality in radial growth-climate relationships in a twelve site network in western Labrador, Canada. Dendrochronologia, 29:17-23</font><font face=TimesNewRoman,Italic>.</font></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br><font size="2">[</font><a href="#abs27" ><font size=2>View abstract</font></a><font size="2">] </font></font>[<a href="western.pdf" ><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a>]</p> <li> <p align="left"><font size="2"><font face="Verdana">Quann, S.L.,&nbsp;Young, A.B.,&nbsp;<strong>Laroque C.P.</strong>,&nbsp;Falcon-Lang, H.J., and&nbsp;Gibling, M.R.,&nbsp;2010. Dendrochronological dating of coal mine workings at Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, Canada. Atlantic Geology, 46:185-194</font><font face=TimesNewRoman,Italic>.</font></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br><font size="2">[</font><a href="#abs26" ><font size=2>View abstract</font></a><font size="2">] </font></font>[<a href="joggins.pdf" ><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a>]</p> <li> <p align="left"><font face="Verdana" size="2">Nishimura, P.H., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2010. Tree-ring evidence of larch sawfly outbreaks in western Labrador, Canada. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 40:1542-1549.</font><br><font face="Verdana" size="2">[</font><a href="#abs21" ><font face=Verdana size=2>View abstract</font></a><font face="Verdana" size="2">] </font>[<a href="CJFR2010.pdf"><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a>] </p> <li> <font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"></font> <p align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><font size=2>Trindade M., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2009. Multidisciplinary applications of tree-ring analysis in Newfoundland and Labrador.&nbsp; Ktaqamkuk (Irish Journal of Newfoundland and Labrador Studies), 1: 126-143.<br></font></font>[<a href="#abs20" ><font face=Verdana size=2>View abstract</font></a><font size="2"><font face=Verdana>]</font> </font>[<a href="kta2009.pdf" ><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a>] </p></li></ul> <ul> <li> <p align="left"><font size="2"><font face="Verdana">Robichaud, A., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. Dendroarchaeology in southwestern Nova Scotia and the construction of a regional red spruce chronology. Tree-Ring Research, 64(1): 17-25</font></font>. <font face=Verdana><br><font size="2">[</font><a href="#abs19" ><font face=Verdana size=2>View abstract</font></a><font face="Verdana" size=2>][</font><a href="andre.pdf" ><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a><font size="2"><font face=Verdana>] </font><br></font></font></p><font face=Verdana></font><font face="Verdana"> <li> <div align="left"> <p><font size="2">Selig, N., <strong>Laroque, C.P</strong>., and Marsh, S., 2007. Dendroarchaeological investigations in the Maritimes: A case study of Dorchester House, New Brunswick. Material Culture Review, 66:42-49.<br>[</font><a href="#abs18" ><font size=2>View abstract</font></a><font size="2">][</font><a href="nigel.pdf" ><font size=2>Download paper</font></a><font size="2">] <br></font></p></div> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana" size="2">Campbell, L.J., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2007. Decay progression and classification in two old-growth forests in Atlantic Canada. Forest Ecology and Management, 238: 293-301.<br>[</font><a href="#abs17" ><font face=Verdana size=2>View abstract</font> </a><font face="Verdana" size=2>][</font><a href="lanna.pdf" ><font face=Verdana size=2>Download paper</font></a><font face="Verdana" size=2>]</font> <br></div> <li> <div align="left"> <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J., 2005. Predicted short-term radial-growth changes of trees based on past climate on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Dendrochronologia, 22: 163-168.<br>[<a href="#abs16" >View abstract</a>][<a href="dendrochrono.pdf" >Download paper</a>]</font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><br></font></p></div> <li> <div align="left"> <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Bachrach, T., Jakobsen, K., Kinney, J., Nishimura, P., Reyes, A., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J., 2004. Dendrogeomorphological assessment of movement at Hilda rock glacier, Banff National Park, Canadian Rocky Mountains. Geografiska Annaler A, 86A(1): 1-9.<br>[<a href="#abs1" >View abstract</a>][<a href="ga2004.pdf" >Download paper</a>]</font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><br></font></p></div> <li> <div align="left"> <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J., 2003. Radial-growth forecasts for five high-elevation conifer species on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Forest Ecology and Management, 183: 313-325.</font> <br><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2>[<a href="#abs12" >View abstract</a>] [<a href="fem2003.pdf" >Download paper</a>]</font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><br></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><b></b></font></p></div> <li> <div align="left"> <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Lewis, D.H., and Smith, D. J., 2000/01. Treeline dynamics on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Western Geography, 10/11: 43-63. <br>[<a href="#abs11" >View abstract</a>] [<a href="wg2001.pdf" >Download paper</a>]</font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><br></font></p></div> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2 >Kellner, A.E., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Smith, D.J., and Harestad, A.S., 2000. Chronological dating of high-elevation dead and dying trees on Northern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Northwest Science, 74: 242-247. <br>[<a href="#abs2" >View abstract</a>] [<a href="nws2000.pdf" >Download paper</a>]<br><br></font></div> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2 >Carter, R., LeRoy, S., Nelson, T., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J., 1999. Dendroglaciological investigations at Hilda Creek rock glacier, Banff National Park, Canadian Rocky Mountains. Gographie physique et Quaternaire, 53: 365-371. <br>[<a href=" #abs3" >View abstract</a>] [<a href="gpq1999.pdf" >Download paper</a>]<br><br></font></div> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J., 1999. Tree-ring analysis of yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 29: 115-123. <br>[<a href="#abs4" >View abstract</a>] [<a href="cjfr99.pdf" >Download paper</a>]<br><br></font></div> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2>Smith, D.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, 1998. Mountain hemlock growth dynamics on Vancouver Island. Northwest Science, 72 (Special Issue 2): 67-70. <br>[<a href="#abs5" >View abstract</a>] [<a href="nws98.pdf" >Download paper</a>]<br><br></font></div> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2>Smith, D.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, 1998. High-elevation dendroclimatic records from Vancouver Island. In: Decoding Canadas Past: Climate Variations and Biodiversity Change During the Last Millennium. MacIver, D.C. and Meyer, R.E. (eds.). Atmospheric and Environment Services, Downsview, Ontario, 33-44. <br>[<a href="#abs6" >View abstract</a>] [<a href="aes1998.pdf" >Download paper</a>]<br><br></font></div> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2>Smith, D.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, 1996. Dendroglaciological dating of a Little Ice Age glacial advance at Moving Glacier, Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Gographie physique et Quaternaire, 50: 47-55. <br>[<a href="#abs7" >View abstract</a>] [<a href="gpq1996.pdf" >Download paper</a>]<br><br></font></div> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2 >Denton, J.J., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Williams, A.E., and Wilson, P.J., 1995. Proglacial sedimentation in the Loss Creek valley, southwestern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Western Geography, 5: 1-12. <br>[<a href="#abs8" >View abstract</a>] [<a href="wg1996.pdf" >Download paper</a>]<br></font></div><br> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2>Lawby, C.P., Smith, D.J, <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Brugman, M.M., 1995. Glaciological studies at Rae Glacier, Canadian Rocky Mountains. Physical Geography, 15:425-441.<br>[<a href="#abs9" >View abstract</a>] [<a href="p-geog1995.pdf" >Download paper</a>] </font></div></font></li></ul><font face="Verdana"></font> <p align="right"><font face="Verdana"><a href="#top"><font face="Verdana" size=2>Back to Top</font> </a></font></p><font face="Verdana"></font></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><strong><a name=theses></a><font size="3">Theses</font></strong></font><font size=3>&nbsp;</font></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"> <div align="left"> <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2 ></font></p></div> <ul> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><i><b>Post Doctorate</b></i>: Examination of climatic controls on biomass production, Vancouver Island, British Columbia<br><br></font></div> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><i><b>Ph.D. Dissertation</b></i>: Dendroclimatic response of high-elevation conifers, Vancouver Island, British Columbia <br>[<a href="#abs14" >View abstract</a>]<br><br></font></div> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><i><b>M.Sc. Thesis</b></i>: The dendrochronology and dendroclimatology of yellow-cedar on Vancouver Island, British Columbia <br>[<a href="#abs15" >View abstract</a>] <br><br></font></div> <li> <div align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size=2><b><i>B.Sc. (Hons) Thesis</i></b>: Radio-echo sounding Rae Glacier, Front Ranges of the southern Canadian Rocky Mountains <br></font></div></li></ul> <p align="right"><a href="#top"><font face="Verdana" size="2">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color=#000000 size=2><strong><a name="conf"></a><font size="3"><strong>Conference Presentations</strong></font></strong></font></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" colspan="6" height="27"> <ul><font size="+0"> <li>Maillet, J., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, 2014. Analysis of white spruce radial growth under coastal influences in Labrador. Annual Meeting of the Western division of the Canadian Association of Geographers. Victoria, BC. March 7-8, 2014. <li>Robichaud, A. and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, 2014. Dating aboiteaux with the use of dendroarchaeology: examples for Acadia. Communication orale donne lors du Colloque sur l archologie historique et subaquatique de la Society for Historical Archaeology, Qubec, Qc, 8-12 janvier 2014. <li>Maillet, J. and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, 2013. Analysis of white spruce radial growth under coastal influences in Labrador. 25th Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers. October 18-20, 2013. Universit de Moncton, Moncton, NB. <li>Clark, M.G., Bell, T., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, 2013. A multi-linear regression model of paleoclimate ice conditions off the coast of Labrador, Canada. Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Geographers. August 11-15, 2013. Department of Geography, Memorial University, August 11-15, 2013 St. John s, Newfoundland. <li>Danek, M., Bell, T., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Sylvester, P., Diegor, W., and Lam, R., 2013. Tree rings as pollution archives: historical lead levels in St. John's. Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Geographers. August 11-15, 2013. Department of Geography, Memorial University, August 11-15, 2013 St. John s, Newfoundland. <li>Davis, E.L, <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Mood, B.J., and Van Rees, K., 2013. White spruce now and then: Determining the growth response of shelterbelt trees to climate change in the Canadian Prairies. Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Geographers. August 11-15, 2013. Department of Geography, Memorial University, August 11-15, 2013 St. John s, Newfoundland. <li><b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Kershaw, G., and Castleden, H., 2013. Downwind of Big Bitumen: A dendrochronological assessment of atmospheric pollution effects from Athabasca bitumen mining. Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Geographers. August 11-15, 2013. Department of Geography, Memorial University, August 11-15, 2013 St. John s, Newfoundland. <li>Maillet, J., Jennings, C., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Van Rees, K. 2013. Dendroclimatological study of shelterbelt trees in a moisture limited environment. Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Geographers. August 11-15, 2013. Department of Geography, Memorial University, August 11-15, 2013 St. John s, Newfoundland. <li>Mood, B.J., Clark, M.G., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Van Rees, K., 2013. Determining physiological stress and growth thresholds of white spruce in southern Saskatchewan. Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Geographers. August 11-15, 2013. Department of Geography, Memorial University, August 11-15, 2013 St. John s, Newfoundland. <li>Myers, D., Bell, T., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, 2013. A dendrochronological investigation of historic spruce budworm cycles in balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill) in Newfoundland. Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Geographers. August 11-15, 2013. Department of Geography, Memorial University, August 11-15, 2013 St. John s, Newfoundland. <li>Amichev, B.Y., Bentham, M.J., Cerkowniak, D. Kort, J., Kulshreshtha, S., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Piwowar, J., and Van Rees, K. 2013. Mapping shelterbelts in Saskatchewan: A living legacy of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada PFRA Shelterbelt Centre. 13th North American Agroforestry Conference, Charlottetown, PE, June 2013. <li>Mood, B.J., Clark, M.G., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> 2013. Forests of the Future? Using Mean Sensitivity as a Measure of Physiological Stress and the Future Climate-Envelope Contraction of White Spruce in Saskatchewan. Science Atlantic Biology (43nd), Aquaculture and Fisheries (23nd) and Environment (11th) Conference. Wolfville, Nova Scotia. March 15-17, 2013. <li>Carter, J.D.H., Mood, B.J., Wagar, M.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> 2012. Reading Between the Layers - The Stratigraphy near Cavell Lake. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS, October 2012. <li>Jennings, C., Maillet, J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> 2012. Examining growth patterns of Picea glauca and Fraxinus pennsylvanica across a latitudinal gradient. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS, October 2012. <li>Kershaw, G.G.L., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Castleden, H.E. 2012. Talking to Trees: A Dendrochronology Study on Oil Sands Atmospheric Pollution in Clearwater River Dene Territory. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS, October 2012. <li>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Clark, G., and Dillon, J. 2012. The Ghost Glacier Gallop: A Geomorphological Race to Destruction. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS, October 2012. <li>Maillet, J., Jennings, C., Murray, S., Clark, G., and <b>Laroque, C. P. </b>2012. Rockin' Out With Ghost Glacier.Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS, October 2012. <li>Mood, B.J, and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> 2012. Spacious Spruce: Spatial Patterns of Picea glauca Growth in Southern Saskatchewan. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS, October 2012. <li>Murray, S., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> 2012. Using X-rays to Get to the Root of the Problem - Are Refinery Pollutants Stored in Tree Rings? Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS, October 2012. <li>Wagar, M.J., Mood, B.J., Carter, J., and <b>Laroque, C.P. </b>2012. Blasted Out of the Past! A Dendroglaciological Study in the Mount Edith Cavell Area. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS, October 2012. <li>Hogan, E.K., and <b>Laroque, C.P. </b>2012. Lessons for Little Loraxes: A Look at Education for Sustainable Development in the Maritimes. Summer Undergraduate Research Fair. Mount Allison University, September 2012. <li>Jennings, C., and <b>Laroque, C.P. </b>2012. Seeking Spruce Shelter: A latitudinal transect in Eastern Saskatchewan. Summer Undergraduate Research Fair. Mount Allison University, September 2012. <li>Maillet, J. and <b>Laroque, C.P. </b>2012. Growth analysis of Fraxinus pennsylvanica in prairie shelterbelt systems. Summer Undergraduate Research Fair. Mount Allison University, September 2012. <li>Mood, B.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P. </b>2012. Delineating spatial patterns of Picea glauca (Moench) Voss radial growth in southern Saskatchewan, Canada. Summer Undergraduate Research Fair. Mount Allison University, September 2012. <li>Murray, S.G., and <b>Laroque, C.P. </b>2012. The Path of Pollutants: Getting to the Root of the Problem. Summer Undergraduate Research Fair. Mount Allison University, September 2012. <li>Davis, E.L., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> 2012. To plant of not to plant: assessing the fitness of commonly planted shelterbelt species under future climate scenarios. Annual Meeting: Canadian Association of Geographers, Waterloo, ON, May - June 2012. <li>Kershaw, G.G.L., Castleden, H., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> 2012. Canoeing the Clearwater: A dendrchonology study quantifying long-term aerial pollution downwind of the Alberta oil sands. 2012 Annual Meeting: Canadian Association of Geographers, Waterloo, ON, May - June 2012. <li>Kershaw, G.G.L., Castleden, H., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> 2012. Downwind of the oil sands: engaging Clearwater River Dene youth in an experimental science project. 2012 Annual Meeting: Canadian Association of Geographyers, Waterloo, ON, May - June 2012. <li>Mood, B.J., Borneman, J., Bousada, G., Kewshaw, G.G.L., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> 2012. Volume loss of the Saskatchewan Glacier: Glacier-temperature dynamics observed through raster analysis. 2012 Annual Meeting: Canadian Association of Geographers, Waterloo, ON, May - June 2012. <li>Quann, S.L., Young, A.B., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Falcon-Lang, H.J., and Gibling, M.R. Dendroarchaeological evidence of coal extraction time periods, Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, Canada. Annual meeting, Canadian Archaeological Association, Montreal, PQ, May 2012. <li><b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Robichaud, A., and Dillon, M. Who lobbed the lobstick? Dating the Jasper Lobstick, Jasper National Park, Alberta. Annual meeting, Canadian Archaeological Association, Montreal, PQ, May 2012. <li> Danek, M., Robichaud, A., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Developing a regional eastern larch (Larix larcinia) chronology for the Maritimes. Annual meeting, Canadian Archaeological Association, Montreal, PQ, May 2012. <li>Davis, E.L.,and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Determining climate variability in nine shelterbelt-tree species using tree-ring analysis. Annual meeting Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers Sackville, NB, October 2011. <li>Mood, B.J., Robichaud, A., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>Dendroarchaeological investigations at the Campbell Carriage Factory, Sackville, NB. Annual meeting, Canadian Archaeological Association, Montreal, PQ, May 2012. <li>Robichaud, A., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Anneaux et aboiteaux : comment se servir du bois pour tudier le pass. Annual meeting, Canadian Archaeological Association, Montreal, PQ, May 2012. <li>Jennings, C., Robichaud, A., Erhman, J.M., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>Odes of Joy, or Sounds of Silence? How do you sample a "priceless" artifact? Annual meeting, Canadian Archaeological Association, Montreal, PQ, May 2012. <li>Hogan, E., Davis, E., Jennings, C., Hall, S., Mood, B.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> A Dendroarchaeological Analysis of the Cormier House Sackville, New Brunswick. Annual meeting, Canadian Archaeological Association, Montreal, PQ, May 2012. <li>Danek, M., Young. A.B., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Bell, T. A preliminary dendrochronological assessment of subfossil trees from central Labrador. International Polar Year Conference, Montreal, PQ, April, 2012. <li>Kershaw, G.G.L., Castleden, H., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Communicating environmental risks of Alberta Oil Sands' air pollution with members of the Clearwater River Den First Nation. Annual meeting, American Association of Geographers, New York, NY, Feb. 2012. <li> Kershaw, G.G.L., Castleden, H., <b>Laroque, C.P. </b>Communicating Environmental Risks of Alberta Oil Sands  Air Pollution with Members of the Clearwater River Den First Nation. Information Without Borders 6th Annual Conference, Halifax, Nova Scotia, February 9th 2012. <li>Kershaw, G.G.L., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Castleden, H. Downwind of the oil sands: A Clearwater River dendrochronology study quantifying long-term aerial pollution in boreal Alberta and Saskatchewan. Annual meeting Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers Sackville, NB, October 2011. <li>Hogan, E.K., and <b>Laroque, C.P. </b>Hemlock Holmes, Tree Detective: Creating an interdisciplinary educational resource based on tree rings. Annual meeting Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers Sackville, NB, October 2011. <li>Jennings, C., Ehrman, J., Robichaud, A., and <b>Laroque, C.P. </b>Fact or fiction: Changing the tune of an old violin. Annual meeting Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers Sackville, NB, October 2011. <li>Davis, E.L., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Taking shelter from Climate change: An analysis of shelterbelt species in the Canadian Prairies. Annual Meeting, Science Atlantic, Sackville, NB, March 2012. <li>Hogan, E.K., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Hemlock Holmes, Tree Detective- Exploring environmental science education with the help of tree rings. Annual Meeting, Science Atlantic, Sackville, NB, March 2012 <li>MacMichael, M.F., Mood, B.J., McLelland, M.A., Nelson, B.K., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Expansion of Xanthoria elegans and Aspicila candida radial growth curves through comparitive lichenometric dating techniques at the Stutfield Glacier, Canadian Rocky Mountains. Annual Meeting, Science Atlantic, Sackville, NB, March 2012 <li>Mood, B., and <b>Laroque, C.P. </b>Accessible science: Making research outcomes available to Canadian citizens through technology. Annual meeting Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers Sackville, NB, October 2011. <li>Quann, S.L., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Comparative analysis of spruce budworm outbreak detection methods. Annual meeting Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers Sackville, NB, October 2011. <li>Davis, E.L., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Dendrochronological analysis of nine tree species in Canadian Prairie shelterbelts. Summer Undergraduate Research Fair. Mount Allison University, September 2011. <li>Hogan, E.K., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Hemlock Holmes, Tree detective: Creating an interdisciplinary educational resource based on tree rings. Summer Undergraduate Research Fair. Mount Allison University, September 2011. <li>Jennings, C., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Odes of Joy, or Sounds of Silence? A dendrochronological investigation of an old violin. Summer Undergraduate Research Fair. Mount Allison University, September 2011. <li>Mood, B., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Aiding the shelterbelt decision making process through an internet-based program. Summer Undergraduate Research Fair. Mount Allison University, September 2011. <li>Quann, S.L., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Evaluating methods of determining spruce budworm outbreaks. Summer Undergraduate Research Fair. Mount Allison University, September 2011. <li><b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Ehrman, J.N., and Robichaud, A. Wood anatomy identification in dendroarchaeology: Don t touch the wood, please. Annual meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, Calgary, AB, May-June 2011. <li>Kershaw, G.G.L., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Spatial regimes of climate/radial-growth relationships in Labrador, Canada: The case of trembling aspen (<i>Populus tremuloides</i> Michx). Annual meeting, American Association of Geographers, Seattle, WA, April 2011. <li>Clark, M.G., Nishimura, P., Dumaresq, D., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Bell, T. Continental patterns of tree growth as explained by synoptic forcing over the northern Atlantic and the inferred climatological patterns. Annual meeting, American Association of Geographers, Seattle, WA, April 2011. <li><strong>Laroque, C.P</strong>., Young, A.B., Bell, T., and Niles, L., 2010. The endless jigsaw puzzle: Dendrochronologically dating logs from bogs and rivers in Labrador. 22nd Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers. October 1-3, 2010. Department of Geography, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland. <li>Bousada, G., Mood, B., Kershaw, G., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2010. Three-dimensional modeling of ice loss since the Little Ice Age at the Saskatchewan Glacier, Alberta, Canada.&nbsp; 22nd Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers. October 1-3, 2010. Department of Geography, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland. <li>Kershaw, G.G.L.; and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2010. Trans-Labrador radial growth-climate analysis using trembling aspen (Populus tremuloidies Michx). 22nd Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers. October 1-3, 2010. Department of Geography, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland. <li>Quann, S.L., Young, A.B.,<strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> Falcon-Lang, H.J., and Gibling, M.R., 2010.&nbsp;Dendroarchaeological investigations of coal mine workings at the Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, Canada. 22nd Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers. October 1-3, 2010. Department of Geography, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland. <li>Daniel, A., Thomas, E., Robichaud, A., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2010. Dendrochronologically dating the Jasper lobstick tree, Jasper, Alberta. 22nd Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers. October 1-3, 2010. Department of Geography, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland. <li>Trant, A.,&nbsp;Bell, T.&nbsp;Hermanutz, L.,&nbsp;Jacobs, J.,&nbsp;<strong>Laroque, C.P</strong>.,&nbsp;Lewis, K.,&nbsp;Simms, A.,&nbsp;Simms, E., Bartlett, Z.,&nbsp;Chan, S.,&nbsp;Cranston, B.,&nbsp;Jameson, R.,&nbsp;Morrison, H.,&nbsp;Munier, A.,&nbsp;Sutton, E.,&nbsp;Trindade, M.,&nbsp;Wheeler, J., 2010. A (Complicated) Story of Treeline Dynamics in the Mealy Mountains, Canada. IPY International Science Conference 2010, Oslo, Norway.</font></font> <li><strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> Young, A., Phillips, B., and Presley, M., 2010. Dendrochronological evidence for the Moffat Stick: Canadas oldest hockey stick. Prairie Summit - Le sommet des Prairies. Joint Conference of Canadian Association of Geographers, Canadian Cartographic Association, Canadian Geomorphology Research Group, Canadian Remote Sensing Society / Confrence conjointe de lAssociation canadienne des gographes, lAssociation canadienne de cartographie, le Groupe canadien de recherche en gomorphologie, la Socit canadienne de tldtection. June 1 to 5. Regina, Saskatchewan. <li>White, C., <strong>Laroque, C.,</strong> and Smith, D.J., 2010. A maximum density comparison of white spruce to growing season temperatures at two sites along the Labrador treeline. Prairie Summit - Le sommet des Prairies. Joint Conference of Canadian Association of Geographers, Canadian Cartographic Association, Canadian Geomorphology Research Group, Canadian Remote Sensing Society / Confrence conjointe de lAssociation canadienne des gographes, lAssociation canadienne de cartographie, le Groupe canadien de recherche en gomorphologie, la Socit canadienne de tldtection. June 1 to 5. Regina, Saskatchewan. <li>Robichaud, A., Young, A., <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2010. Apport de la dendroarcheologie a la documentation d'un site candidat a la liste du patrimoine mondial de l'UNESCO (Grand-Pre, Nouvelle-Ecosse). Prairie Summit - Le sommet des Prairies. Joint Conference of Canadian Association of Geographers, Canadian Cartographic Association, Canadian Geomorphology Research Group, Canadian Remote Sensing Society / Confrence conjointe de lAssociation canadienne des gographes, lAssociation canadienne de cartographie, le Groupe canadien de recherche en gomorphologie, la Socit canadienne de tldtection. June 1 to 5. Regina, Saskatchewan. <li><strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> Young, A., Phillips, B.E., Ehrman, J., Karpowicz, A., and Presley, M., 2010.<br>Scientific Evidence: The Moffat Stick provenance. Annual General meeting of the Society for International Hockey Research. May 14-15. Brandon, Manitoba. <li><strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> Young, A.B., and Presley, M., 2010. The Moffatt stick: Adding scientific evidence to the provenance of one of Canadas oldest hockey sticks. Annual meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Edmonton, AB, March 2010. <li> White, C.A., <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Smith, D.J. A maximum latewood density analysis of white spruce trees from northern Labrador. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS, October. <li>Quann, S.K., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong> 2009. Dendroarcheological investigation of Joggins Fossil Cliff mine workings. Mount Allison University Science Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, NB, September. <li>White, C.A., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong> 2009. X-ray density at treeline in Labrador. Mount Allison University Science Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, NB, September. <li>Selig, N.E.W., Phillips, B., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2009. Radial growth forecasts of Tsuga canadensis, Acer saccharum, Picea glauca and Pinus strobus in the Grand River Watershed, Ontario.&nbsp;Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Geographers. May 26-30, 2009. Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario. <li><strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Young, A.B., 2009. Exploring coal mine pit props at the Joggins Fossil Cliff World UNESCO heritage site. 51st Annual Meeting of the Western Division, Canadian Association of Geographers. March 5-7. Vancouver Island University, Nanaimo, British Columbia. <li>MacDonald, H.C, and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. Dendroclimatology in Labrador using Harrimanella hypnoides. Mount Allison University, Sixth Annual Science Undergraduate Research Fair (SURF), September 13. <li>Pickard, F., <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Baltzer, J., 2008. A north-south gradient analysis of radial growth for Picea mariana in Western Labrador. Mount Allison University, Sixth Annual Science Undergraduate Research Fair (SURF), September 13. <li>White, C., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. X-ray density of eight softwood trees in Sussex, NB. Mount Allison University, Sixth Annual Science Undergraduate Research Fair (SURF),&nbsp; September 13. <li>d'Entremont, N., Hoyland, J., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. Enhancing dendrochronology through the use of flow cytometry. Mount Allison University, Sixth Annual Science Undergraduate Research Fair (SURF),&nbsp;September 13. <li>Bell, T., Dumeresq, A.D., Kennedy, C., Nishimura, P.H., Trindade, M., <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Young, A.B., 2008. Tree ring studies in Labrador: Investigating spatial and temporal patterns in climatic and ecological factors influencing tree growth.&nbsp; International Arctic Change 2008 Conference. December 9-12, 2008. Quebec City, Quebec. <li>Dumeresq, D., <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Bell, T., 2008. Radial growth sensitivity of conifer species to summer temperature in eastern Labrador. Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Division, Canadian Association of Geographers. October 17-18, 2008, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick. <li>Kennedy, C.J ., <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Bell, T., 2008. Investigating tree line in northern Labrador. Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Division, Canadian Association of Geographers. October 17-18, 2008, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick. <li>Robichaud, A., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. Acadian aboiteaux from the Maritime Provinces of Canada: a dendroarchaeological analysis. Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Division, Canadian Association of Geographers. October 17-18, 2008, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick. <li>Trindade, M., MacDonald, H., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. Trees rings! Tree rings! Is there anything else!? Identifying annual growth increments in an arctic dwarf shrub. Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Division, Canadian Association of Geographers. October 17-18, 2008, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick. <li>White, C., <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Smith, D.J., 2008. Exploring X-ray density parameters of trees and climate in New Brunswick. Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Division, Canadian Association of Geographers. October 17-18, 2008, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick. <li> <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> Nishimura, P., and Dumeresq, A.D., 2008. Radial growth response of conifers from northern to southern Labrador. AmeriDendro 2008. First American Dendrochronology Conference. June 23-27, 2008, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia.&nbsp; <li>Trindade, M., Bell, T., <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Jacobs, J., 2008. Comparative analysis of the radial growth response of four alpine treeline species in Eastern Canada. AmeriDendro 2008. First American Dendrochronology Conference. June 23-27, 2008, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. <li>Campbell, L., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. Nova Scotias rare population of eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis): A radial-growth investigation. 400 Years of Discovery. 2008 Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Geographers. May 20-24, 2008. Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec.&nbsp; <li>Dumaresq, D., <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Bell, T., 2008. Radial growth analysis of three conifer species in Coastal Labrador. 400 Years of Discovery. 2008 Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Geographers. May 20-24, 2008. Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec. <li> <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> Nelson, T., and Smith, D.J., 2008. Detecting spatial connections within a dendrochronological network on Vancouver Island. 400 Years of Discovery. 2008 Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Geographers. May 20-24, 2008. Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec. <li> Macdonald, H., <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Fleming, D., 2008. Dendrochemical analysis of the Sydney Steel Plant site. 400 Years of Discovery. 2008 Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Geographers. May 20-24, 2008. Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec. <li> Nishimura, P., Trindade, M., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. Dendrochronology and dendroclimatology at four sites in southcentral Labrador. 400 Years of Discovery. 2008 Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Geographers. May 20-24, 2008. Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec. <li> Phillips, B., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. Shifting climate zones and the potential radial growth response of established Acadian forest tree species. 400 Years of Discovery. 2008 Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Geographers. May 20-24, 2008. Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec. <li> Pickard, F., Robichaud, A., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. Dendroarchaeological dating of a First Nations canoe, New Brunswick. 400 Years of Discovery. 2008 Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Geographers. May 20-24, 2008. Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec. <li> Robichaud, A., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. Dendroarchaeological wood use in historical structures of Maritime Canada. 400 Years of Discovery. 2008 Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Geographers. May 20-24, 2008. Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec. <li> Trindade, M., Bell, T., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. The occurrence of the divergence problem in eastern North America. 400 Years of Discovery. 2008 Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Geographers. May 20-24, 2008. Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec. <li> Pickard, F.D., Robichaud, A., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008.&nbsp; Establishing a White Pine Chronology to Date a Historical First Nations Dugout Canoe. Atlantic Provinces Council for the Sciences (APICS) - Environmental Studies Conference. March 6-8, 2008, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish NS. <li> McQuaid, M., Robichaud,A., and <strong >Laroque C.P.,</strong> 2008. Prince Edward Island radial-growth chronologies. Atlantic Provinces Council for the Sciences (APICS) - Environmental Studies Conference. March 6-8, 2008, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish NS. <li> dEntremont, N., Robichaud, A., and <strong >Laroque C.P.,</strong> 2008. The oldest recorded tree in Nova Scotia. Atlantic Provinces Council for the Sciences (APICS) - Environmental Studies Conference. March 6-8, 2008, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish NS. <li> MacDonald, H., and <strong >Laroque C.P.,</strong> 2008. Trees, X-ray Fluorescence and the Environment of Sydney Tar Ponds. Atlantic Provinces Council for the Sciences (APICS) - Environmental Studies Conference. March 6-8, 2008, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish NS. <li>Nishimura, P., and <strong >Laroque C.P.,</strong> 2008. Tree Ring Analysis in Western Labrador. Atlantic Provinces Council for the Sciences (APICS) - Environmental Studies Conference. March 6-8, 2008, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish NS. <li>Phillips, B., and <strong >Laroque C.P.,</strong> 2008. Future Radial Growth Forecasting of Acadian Forest Trees. Atlantic Provinces Council for the Sciences (APICS) - Environmental Studies Conference. March 6-8, 2008, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish NS. <li>Coulthard, B.L., <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Smith, D.J., 2008.&nbsp; Black spruce (Picea mariana) as an indicator species of the effects of forestry on treed bogs, southwest Nova Scotia. 50th Annual Meeting of the Western Division of the Canadian Association of Western Geographers. March 6-8, 2008. Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington, USA. <li>Hart, S.J., <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Smith, D.J., 2008. A dendroecological assessment of tree island growth trends and patterns in the Cavell Meadows, Jasper National Park, Canadian Rocky Mountains. 50th Annual Meeting of the Western Division of the Canadian Association of Western Geographers. March 6-8, 2008. Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington, USA. <li><strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> Dumeresq, D.D.,and Bell, T., 2008. Radial growth of trees from northeastern to southeastern Labrador. Atlantic Geoscience Society 34th Colloquium and Annual General Meeting, February 1-2, 2008. Holiday Inn Harbourview Hotel, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Canada. <li>Mariana, T., Bell, T., <strong >Laroque, C.P</strong>., Jacobs, J., and Hermanutz, L., 2008. Dendroclimatic response of alpine treeline species in Central Labrador: a multi-species perspective. Atlantic Geoscience Society 34th Colloquium and Annual General Meeting, February 1-2, 2008. Holiday Inn Harbourview Hotel, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Canada. <li>Nishimura, P., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2008. Dendrochronological analysis of four conifers in Western Labrador. Atlantic Geoscience Society 34th Colloquium and Annual General Meeting, February 1-2, 2008. Holiday Inn Harbourview Hotel, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Canada. <li>Phillips, B., and <strong >Laroque, C.P</strong>., 2008. Expanding on radial growth forecasting: future responses of tree species of the Acadian forest to climate change. Atlantic Geoscience Society 34th Colloquium and Annual General Meeting, February 1-2, 2008. Holiday Inn Harbourview Hotel, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Canada. <li><strong>Laroque, C.P</strong> ., Jameison, R., and ONeill, N. A Reconstruction of the Annual Moisture Regime in Jasper, Alberta. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Moncton, NB. October 2007. <li>McQuaid, M., Robichaud, A., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Five radial-growth chronologies for Prince Edward Island trees. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Moncton, NB. October 2007. <li>Campbell, L.J., McQuaid, M., and <strong >Laroque, C.P</strong> . Uncovering Cedar Secrets: A Comparison Study of three Maritime Sites. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Moncton, NB. October 2007. <li>Nishimura, P., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Dendrochronological analysis of Balsam Fir in Central Labrador. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Moncton, NB. October 2007. <li>Trindade, M., Bell T., and <strong >Laroque C.P.</strong> Sensitivity of Labrador trees to local and regional climate. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Moncton, NB. October 2007. <li>Robichaud A., <strong>Laroque, Colin P</strong> .,and Ehrman, J.M. Development of a digital SEM micrograph database on conifer tree species of the Maritimes. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Moncton, NB. October 2007. <li>dEntremont, N., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> North or South? Finding the Oldest Tree in Nova Scotia. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Moncton, NB. October 2007. <li>MacDonald, H., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Using X-Ray Fluorescence to Detect a Chemical Signature From Trees in the Sydney Tar Pond Area. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Moncton, NB. October 2007. <li>Phillips, B., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Forecasting Radial Growth Response of Acadian Forest Trees to Anticipated Climate Warming Scenarios. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Moncton, NB. October 2007. <li>Dumeresq, D., <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong> , and Bell, T. Comparing Ring-width Chronologies from Eastern Labrador Coast. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Moncton, NB. October 2007. <li>Phillips, B., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Developing One Hundred Year Radial Growth Forecasts for Acadian Forest Tree Species. Acadian Forest Science Conference, Fredericton NB. October 2007. <li>MacDonald, H., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Dendroanalysis of the Sydney Tar Ponds Site. Mount Allison University Science Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, New Brunswick. September 2007. <li>McQuaid, M., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Creating an old-growth chronology for trees of Prince Edward Island. Mount Allison University Science Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, New Brunswick. September 2007. <li>dEntremont, N., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Old-Growth Forest Exploration in Northern Nova Scotia. Mount Allison University Science Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, New Brunswick. September 2007. <li>Pickard, F.D., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Dendroarchaeological Dating of a Dugout Canoe. Mount Allison University Science Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, New Brunswick. September 2007. <li><strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Hart, S.J. Connecting sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic to Nova Scotia tree rings. Annual meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, Saskatoon, SK. May-June 2007. <li>Richard, M., <strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> Herman, T., Bondrup-Nielsen, S. Climate Change Impacts Linked to Nova Scotia Blanding's Turtle Growth. The Science and Management of Protected Areas Association Conference, May 21 - 26, 2007, Acadia University, Wolfville NS. <li>Coulthard, B., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Effects of forestry on the radial growth trends of treed bogs in southwestern Nova Scotia. Annual meeting, Atlantic Geoscience Society, Moncton, NB. February 2007. <li>Hart, S.J., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong> Investigating vegetation changes in alpine environments in Jasper National Park. Annual meeting, Atlantic Geoscience Society, Moncton, NB. February 2007. <li>ONeill, N., Robichaud, A., and<strong > Laroque, C.P.</strong> Southwestern Nova Scotias hidden old-growth forests: Extending tree-ring chronologies through historic churches. Annual meeting, Atlantic Geoscience Society, Moncton, NB. February 2007. <li>Phillips, B., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Radial-growth forecasts of five conifers in southeastern New Brunswick. Annual meeting, Atlantic Geoscience Society, Moncton, NB. February 2007. <li>Robichaud, A., Phillips, B., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> The geology of a building: The multiple layers of the Sinclair Inn, Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia. Annual meeting, Atlantic Geoscience Society, Moncton, NB. February 2007. <li>Richard, M., Herman, T., <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Growth ring analysis of immature Blanding's turtles in Nova Scotia with correlation to climate and tree rings. Northeastern Biological Graduate Student Conference, February 23-25 2007, Dalhousie University, Halifax NS. <li><strong>Laroque, C.P.,</strong> and Dillon, M. Dendrochronological investigations of historical log cabins in Jasper National Park: An evaluation of the "Descogine Pipeline Cabin." Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS. October 2006. <li> Coulthard, B., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Radial growth trends of treed bog forests in southwestern Nova Scotia. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS. October 2006. <li>Hart, S.J., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong> Gauging tree island growth patterns in the Canadian Rockies. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS. October 2006. <li>ONeill, N., Robichaud, A., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Historic radial-growth conditions of old-growth forests inferred from church beams of southwestern Nova Scotia. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS. October 2006. <li>Phillips, B., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Growth response of trees to future climates in southeastern New Brunswick. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS. October 2006. <li>Reardon, C., Robichaud, A., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Dendrochronological applications to wetland restoration: A study of larch and black spruce growth in a bog environment. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Halifax, NS. October 2006. <li>Hart, S.J., and <strong>Laroque, C.P</strong> . Extending tree-ring chronologies in southwest Nova Scotia through old-growth forest sampling. Annual meeting, Atlantic Centre for Global Change and Ecosystem Research (ACGCER), Wolfville, NS. September 2006. <li>ONeill, N., Robichaud, A., and <strong >Laroque, C.P</strong> . Extending tree-ring chronologies in southwest Nova Scotia through dendroarcheological methods. Annual meeting, Atlantic Centre for Global Change and Ecosystem Research (ACGCER), Wolfville, NS. September 2006. <li>Coulthard, B., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Protecting treed bogs in southwestern Nova Scotia. Mount Allison University Science Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, New Brunswick. September 2006. <li>Hart, S.J., and <strong>Laroque, C.P.</strong> Addressing alpine ecotone shifts in Jasper National Park. Mount Allison University Science Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, NB. September 2006. <li>ONeill, N., Robichaud, A., and <strong >Laroque, C.P.</strong> Extending tree-ring chronologies in southwestern Nova Scotia through historic structures. Mount Allison University Science Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, NB. September 2006. <li><b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Campbell, L.J., and Phillips, B.E. 2006. North Atlantic Oscillation impacts on spruce from Atlantic Canada. Cultural Diversity, Environmental Variability. 7th International Conference on Dendrochronology. June 11-17, 2006 Beijing, China. <li>Leighton, M., Robichaud, A., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Laroque, C.P.</span> Dendroarchaeological investigation of Acadian buildings from the Village Historique Acadien. Cultural Diversity, Environmental Variability. 7th International Conference on Dendrochronology. June 11-17, 2006 Beijing, China. <li>Campbell, L.J., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> Chronology development from decayed tree-ring samples in Atlantic Canada. Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Geoscience Society. February 3-4, 2006. Greenwich, Nova Scotia. <li><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Laroque, C.P.</span> Climate reconstructions from five conifer species in southwestern Nova Scotia. Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Geoscience Society. February 3-4, 2006. Greenwich, Nova Scotia. <li>Phillips, B., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> Historical and dendrochronological assessment of the Bay of Fundy forests for dendroclimatological modeling, New Brunswick. Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Geoscience Society. February 3-4, 2006. Greenwich, Nova Scotia. <li>Robichaud, A., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> A study of buried forests from two bogs in northern New Brunswick. Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Geosciences Society. February 3-4, 2006. Greenwich, Nova Scotia. <li>Robichaud, C., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P</span>. Future treeline migration based on past radial tree growth, Jasper National Park, Alberta. Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Geoscience Society. February 3-4, 2006. Greenwich, Nova Scotia. <li>Selig, N., Robichaud, A., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> Tree-ring chronology development from house structures in Dorchester, New Brunswick. Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Geoscience Society. February 3-4, 2006. Greenwich, Nova Scotia. <li>Campbell, L.J., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> A parallel study of decay rates of two old-growth forests in Atlantic Canada. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, St. Johns, Newfoundland and Labrador. October 2005. <li><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</font></span> The dendroclimatological potential of five conifer species from southwestern Nova Scotia. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, St. Johns, Newfoundland and Labrador. October 2005. <li>Phillips, B.E., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> Dendroclimatological analysis in the Upper Bay of Fundy region. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers, St. Johns, Newfoundland and Labrador. October 2005. <li>Robichaud, A., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> Logs from bogs: A paleoecological survey of trees from two buried forests on the Acadian Peninsula, New Brunswick. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, St. Johns, Newfoundland and Labrador. October 2005. <li>Robichaud, C.B., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> An analysis of wood turtle (Glyptemys insculpta) growth rings. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, St. Johns, Newfoundland and Labrador. October 2005. <li>Selig, N.E., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Laroque, C.P.</span> Dendroarchaeological investigations in Dorchester, New Brunswick. Annual meeting, Atlantic Division Canadian Association of Geographers, St. Johns, Newfoundland and Labrador. October 2005. <li>Selig, N.E., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Laroque, C.P.</span> Dendrochronology of southwestern Nova Scotia. ACGCER Student Conference, Wolfville, Nova Scotia. September 2005. <li>Campbell, L.J., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> A comparison of old-growth forest decay rates in Atlantic Canada. Mount Allison Student Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, New Brunswick. September 2005. <li>Leighton, M., Robichaud, A., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Laroque, C.P.</span> Dans les forts dAcadie: Dendroarchaeological investigation of Acadian buildings from the Village Historique Acadien. Mount Allison Student Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, New Brunswick. September 2005. <li>Phillips, B.E., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> Comparative analysis between lowland and highland forests in the Fundy region. Mount Allison Student Undergraduate Research Fair, Sackville, New Brunswick. September 2005. <li>Campbell, L.J.,&nbsp; and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Laroque, C.P.</span> Dendroecological analysis of coarse woody debris in pine marten habitat of western Newfoundland. Invited speaker at the Western Newfoundland Model Forest Headquarters, Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador. June 2005. <li>Robichaud, A., and Laroque, C.P. Two dendroecological case studies of dating buried wood in New Brunswick. Annual meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, London, Ontario. May-June 2005. <li>Vanthournout, Z., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Laroque, C.P.</span> Exploration of wind effects on coastal tree-ring morphology in Atlantic Canada. Annual meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, London, Ontario. May-June 2005. <li>Selig, N.E., Robichaud, A., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> Dendroarchaeological investigations in New Brunswick. Annual meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, London, Ontario. May-June 2005. <li>Campbell, L.J., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> Dendroecological analysis of endangered Newfoundland pine marten habitat. Annual meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, London, Ontario. May-June 2005. <li>Robichaud, C.B., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> Treeline migration and evolution in Maligne Pass, Jasper National Park. Annual meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, London, Ontario. May-June 2005. <li>Richard, M.G., Herman, T.B., Bondrup-Nielsen, S., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Laroque, C.P.</span>&nbsp; Lord of the growth rings: A fellowship between Blandings turtles and old trees in southwestern Nova Scotia. Annual meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, London, Ontario. May-June 2005. <li>Robichaud, A., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> Dendrochronological potential of buried wood in Atlantic Canada. Annual meeting, Atlantic Geoscience Society, Saint John, New Brunswick. February 2005. <li>Selig, N.E., Robichaud, A., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> A history mystery: Dendroarchaeological investigations at the Campbell Carriage Factory, Sackville, New Brunswick. Annual meeting, Atlantic Geoscience Society, Saint John, New Brunswick. February 2005. <li>Colford, A., and <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P.</span> Comparative dendrochronological analysis of red spruce from central PEI and southwestern NS. Annual meeting, Atlantic Geoscience Society, Saint John, New Brunswick. February 2005. <li><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P</span>. Dendroclimatology in Atlantic Canada: Ringing the past out of trees. Annual meeting, Atlantic Geoscience Society, Saint John, New Brunswick. February 2005. <li>Laroque, C.P.</b> Establishing paleoclimatic records for Atlantic Canada using dendrochronological methods. Annual Meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, Moncton, New Brunswick, May 25-29, 2004. <li>Brelsford, K.J., Smith, D.J., <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Laroque, C.P.</span>, Mickle, D., and Wallace, R. Tree-ring analysis and contextual explorations of log structures in Jasper, Banff, and Kootenay National Parks, Canada.&nbsp; Association of Washington Geographers, Bellingham, Washington, April 24, 2004. <li><b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D. The lore of the tree rings: Multiple species tell more. Annual Meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, Victoria, British Columbia, May 27-31, 2003. <li>Brelsford, K., Smith, D.J., <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Laroque, C.P.</span>, and Wallace R. Reading the rings: What can tree-rings reveal about human settlement. Annual Meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, Victoria, British Columbia, May 27-31, 2003. <li>Brelsford, K.J., <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque, C.P</span>., Smith, D.J., and Wallace, R. Tracing a history of Jimmy Simpson through the dendrochronological dating of log structures in the National Parks of the Canadian Rockies. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Prince George, B.C. March 2003. <li>Smith, D., <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >Laroque,</span> <b>C.P.</b>, Larocque, S., and Lewis, D. Dendrochronological investigations at treeline on the Pacific Coast, Canada. Climate Variability from Treeline Environments: The Assessment of Present, Past and Future Climate Variability in the Americas from Treeline Environments. Third Annual Science Meeting, Oaxaca, Mexico. April 2002. <li>Brelsford, K.J., Smith, D.J., <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Laroque, C.P.</span>, and Wallace, R. Dendrochronological dating and heritage evaluation of the Ewan Moberly Metis homestead, Jasper National Park. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Vancouver, B.C. March 2002. <li><b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J. A 900-year record of Pacific Decadal Oscillations in Pacific North America. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Calgary, Alberta. March 2001. <li>Challies, M., Cormier, L., Fric, C., George, L., <b >Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J. Bathymetric analysis of Sunwapta Lake. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Calgary, Alberta. March 2001. <li><b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J. Effects of climate on radial growth of high-elevation coastal conifers, British Columbia, Canada. International Conference on Dendrochronology for the Third Millennium, Mendoza, Argentina. April 2000. <li>Bachrach, T., Jakobsen, K., Kinney, J., <b >Laroque, C.P.</b>, Nishimura, P., Reyes, A., and Smith, D.J. Dendroglaciological and morphological evidence of active movement of Hilda Rock Glacier, Banff National Park, Canadian Rocky Mountains. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Abbotsford, British Columbia. March 2000. <li>Day, C., Elmieh, N., Huisman, L., Larson, C., Wood, C., Smith, D.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Neoglaciation at Saskatchewan Glacier, Banff National Park. Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Abbotsford, British Columbia. March 2000. <li>Smith, D.J., Gedalof, Z.M.G., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Lewis, D.H. Little Ice Age climates and glacier regimes in coastal British Columbia: evidence from moraines and tree-rings. Joint Meeting of the Canadian Quaternary Association and the Canadian Geomorphology Research Group. Calgary, Alberta. August 1999. <li><b >Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J. Applied dendroclimatology: Estimating radial growth trends under changing climates at high-elevational sites on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Annual Meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, Lethbridge, Alberta. June 1999. <li>Ferby, T., Smith, D.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Dendrochronological study of historical log cabins in Jasper National Park: an appraisal of the Tangle Creek cabin.' Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Kelowna, British Columbia. March 1999. <li><b >Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J. Understanding Tree Time': dendroclimatological baby steps in the Pacific Northwest. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Kelowna, British Columbia. March 1999. <li>LeRoy, S., Nelson, T., Carter, R., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J. Calender-dated Little Ice Age advance of the Hilda Glacier terminal moraine complex, Banff National Park, Alberta. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Richmond, British Columbia. March 1998. <li>Laroque, C.P.</b>, Zhang, Q., Smith, D.J., and Hebda, R. Reconstruction of Little Ice Age climates on Vancouver Island: an index to glaciological responses in the southern Canadian Cordillera? Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Richmond, British Columbia. March 1998. <li>Lewis, D.H., <b>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J. Tree invasion and regeneration patterns in endangered Vancouver Island marmot habitat. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Prince George, British Columbia. March 1997. <li>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J. A dendrochronological analysis of yellow-cedar from timberline sites on Vancouver Island. Annual Meeting, Canadian Association of Geographers, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. May 1996. <li>Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J. A millennium-long record of climatic change on Vancouver Island, B.C. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Lethbridge, Alberta. March 1996. <li>Smith, D.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> High-elevation dendroclimatic records from Vancouver Island. Workshop on Climate and Biodiversity in Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. January 1996. <li>Smith, D.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> Dendroclimatic records of climate change over the last millennium at high-elevation sites in Strathcona Provincial Park, Vancouver Island. Annual Meeting, Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society, Kelowna, British Columbia, May-June 1995. <li><b >Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J. Establishing a millennium-aged tree species, yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis), for dendroglaciological analysis on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Victoria, British Columbia. March 1995. <li>Smith, D.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> The untold story of Little Ice Age glacial activity on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Victoria, British Columbia. March 1995. <li>Smith, D.J., and <b>Laroque, C.P.</b> The growth responses of mountain hemlock and yellow-cedar to changes in climate at high-elevation sites on Vancouver Island. Fifteenth Annual Forest and Tree Related Research Colloquium, Victoria, British Columbia. April 1995. <li> <b >Laroque, C.P.</b>, and Smith, D.J. Dendroclimatological index of climatic fluctuations in the Forbidden Plateau area, Strathcona Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Annual Meeting, Western Division Canadian Association of Geographers, Kamloops, British Columbia. March 1994.<br ><br><a href="#top" > <div align="right">Back to Top</div></a> </li></ul><font size="+0" ><font face="Verdana"><font face=Verdana></font></font></font></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" height="27" colspan="6"><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong >Abstracts for Publications</strong></font></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" height="27" colspan="6"> <p align="left">&nbsp;</p> <tr> <td><a name=abs32><strong >Davis, E.L., Laroque, C.P., and Van Rees, K.,</strong>, 2013. Evaluating the suitability of nine shelterbelt species for dendrochronoligcal purposes in the Canadian Prairies. Agroforestry Systems, 87:713-727.</font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" ></font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana" >Shlterbelts have played an important role in prairie agriculture since the late 1800's; however, little is known abut how these shelterbelts may be affected by climate change. The objective of this study was to determine if shelterbelt species, which are heavily influced by human activity, express a common radial growth signal within and between trees. The study focused on the annual tree-ring growth of the nine most common species of the Canadian Prairies: Salix acutifolia (Acute willow), Caragana arborescens (caragana, or Siberian pea shrub), Picea pungens (Colorado spruce), Fraxinus pennsulvanica (green ash), Populus sp. (hybrid poplar), Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine), Ulmus pumila (Siberian elm) and Picea glauca (white spruce). Tree core samples were collected near Saskatoon, Saskatchewan using traditiional dendrochronological methods. The standardized growth of each species was compared with historical homogenized climate data in order to determine the key monthly climate variables impacted each species. Prior to this analysis, little was known about the stuiability of six of these nine species for dendrochronoligcal purposes. It was found that all species crossdate at a significant levele, and that the three most significantly correlated climate factors are able to account for up to 37% of the annual variation in tree-ring growth. The findings of this study suggest that all nine species are suitable, to varying degrees, for duture dendrochronological research in the Canadian Prairies as well as having implications for shelterbelt systems elsewhere in the world. The top four species based on four ranking criteria(interseries correlation, mean sensitivity, climate explanatory power, and commonality) were white spruce, acute willow, caragana, and Manitobia maple, and initla results suggest that all species have the ptoential to be investigated in greater depth.</font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr></font></p> <tr> <td><a name=abs30><strong >Anderson, F., Brunt, J., Cameron, R., Caverhill, B., Clapp, D., Clapp, H., Coulthard, B., Hart, S., Helmer, L., Hubley, S., Hurlburt, D., Imlay, T., Jameson, R., Kidd, P., Laroque, C.P., Marotte, R., Marshall, K., Mitchell, S.C., Neily, T., Nickerson, K., O'Neill, N., Phillips, B., Pross, C., Proulx, G., Reardon, C., Todd, J., and Towers, J. </strong>, 2012. Bioblitz of the Lake Rossingnol Wilderness Area. Proceedings of the Nova Scotian Institute of Science, 47:33-57.</font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" ></font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana" >The Lake Rossignnol Wilderness Area is a 4100 ha protected area in Queens County, Nova Scotia. In July, 2006, the Protected Areas Branch of Nova Scotia Environment invited 34 scientists, students and volunteers to condunct a four day bioblitz of this little studied protected area. Surveys were conducted for reptiles, fish, vascular plants, fungi, lichens, and bryophytes. Physical and biological attributes of peatlands and dendrochronoligcal studies were also conducted. A total of 294 species were identified during tyhe survey, 285 of which are new records for the Wilderness Area. Dendrochronological analysis suggests trees at the site have been frowin in place for at least the last 350 years. </font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr></font></p> <tr> <td><a name=abs30><strong >Kershaw, G.G.L., and Laroque, C.P.</strong>, 2012. The dendroclimatological potential of white birch (Betula papyrifera) in Labrador, Canada. The Northeastern Geographer, 4:28-38.</font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" ></font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana" ><strong> Context:</strong> Sites whre trees are at the extreme of their climatological limits are best suited for building climate reconstructions. White birch (Betula papyrifera) are often found in Canada pressing the northern extent of the boreal forest. <strong>Aims:</strong> This study tests the dendroclimatological potential of white birch near its northern range limit by comparing a master chronology from Labrador City, Newfoundland, Canada (N52.58, W66.55) with temperature and precipitation data from the region. <strong>Methods:</strong> Twenty trees were sampled twice each and crossdated to create a standardized master chronology. Temperature and precipitation data spanning 1960 - 2008 were compared to a standardized version of the master chronology. <strong>Results:</strong> Core samples spanned 160 years (1851-2010) with a mean age of 135. Series exhibited high intercorrelation (0.425), mean sensitivity (0.374), and autocorrelation (0.808) values. The standardized chronology exhibited strong correlations with mid-summer temperature, as well as a minor relationship with moisture availibility in the previous summer. <strong> Conclusion:</strong> The high mean sensitivity is indicative of other regional variance. In comparision to previous dendroclimatological studies in the area, white birch appears to have a less muted climate signal, as evidenced by its strong annual growth correlations with June and July temperature. The weak association with precipitation is indicative of other species in Labrador. This study demonstrates that high-quality dendrochronological data can be attained from white birch trees in the Labrador region and consequently, this species should be recognized as potentially a key indicator of temperature trends in the region.</font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr></font></p> <tr> <td><a name=abs29><strong >Hart, S.J., and Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2012. Searching for thresholds in climate-radial growth relationships of Engelmann spruce and subalpine for, Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada. Dendrochronologia, 31:9-15.</font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" ></font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana" >The relationship between monthly climate predictors and radial growth of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanni Parry) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt) were explored using both a standard dendroclimatological approach and a multiple adaptive regressions splines (MARS) framework. Consistent with previous research, the radial growth of fir and spruce was related to temperature variables over the time period of the instrumental record. We identify important temporal instability in the statistical relationships between climate variables and the radial growth of both subalpine fir and Engelmann spruce. Using a 30-year running window, only four of the climate variables related to the radial growth of either spruce or fir did not show a switch in the sign of the correlation. A multiple adaptive regressions spline method was then used to gain insight into thresholds that may relate to radial growth/climate instabilities. Using MARS, we were able to identify knots and non-monotonic relationships between radial growth and climate predictors that may be indicators of ecological thresholds. This combination of dendroclimatic methods provides valuable insight into the complex nonlinear responses that both subalpine fir and Engelmann spruce have been growing under in the past centuries.</font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr></font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana" > <tr> <td><a name=abs28></a><strong >Trindade, M., Bell, T., Laroque, C.P., Jacobs, J.D., and Hermanutz, L</strong>., 2011.&nbsp;Dendroclimatic response of a coastal alpine treeline: a multispecies perspective from Labrador. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 41: 469-478.</font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana" >Coastal alpine forests are highly vulnerable to oceanic climate trends, yet these diverse environmental interac- tions remain poorly understood. We used a multispecies perspective to try to better assess the radial growth response of al- pine treeline species within the Northeast Atlantic region of North America to climate variables using bootstrapped correlation analysis. The four species present, black spruce (<i>Picea mariana </i>(Mill.) B.S.P.), white spruce (<i>Picea glauca </i>(Moench) Voss), balsam fir (<i>Abies balsamea </i>(L.) Mill.), and eastern larch (<i>Larix laricina </i>(Du Roi) K. Koch) were sampled in an effort to capture treeclimate sensitivity that is representative of this entire alpine treeline. The climategrowth rela- tionships of spruce trees were comparable with those reported in other Labrador studies, but spring drought sensitivity as reported for coastal northern white spruce trees was not observed. Rather, high levels of precipitation suggest that drought did not limit the radial growth of any of the four species. The relatively small number of statistically significant correla- tions between monthly climate variables and fir and larch trees suggests that factors other than climate limit their radial growth. The multispecies approach better highlighted the range of species-specific relationships between alpine treeline forests and maritime climates (monthly temperature and precipitation) found at the treeline ecotone.</font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><a name=abs25></a><strong >Trisalyn A. Nelson, Laroque, C.P., and Dan J. Smith,</strong> 2011.&nbsp;Detecting spatial connections within a dendrochronological network on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Dendrochronologia 29:49-54<font size="3" face="Times New Roman" >.</font></font><br><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br ></font><font size="2" face="Verdana" >In dendrochronology, temporal patterns in radial growth are considered an expression of historical cli- mate processes that cannot be measured. Dendrochronological networks, developed to characterize the geographical and temporal patterns of tree rings, have additional spatial information that can add to our understanding of historical climate conditions. This paper summarizes the use of spatial autocorrelation statistical tools for quantifying spatial trends in dendrochronological networks. Using this approach it is possible to characterize the spatial nature of the process influencing radial growth trends within a tree-ring network. Using a local or mapable measure of spatial autocorrelation it is possible to locate clusters of similar and extreme radial growth trends in any given year and to characterize the persistence of spatial patterns of growth through time. Applied to a dendrochronological network of yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (D. Don) Spach), our results suggest that spatial patterns in extreme growth are most often associated with growth limiting climate processes. </font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><a name=abs24></a><strong >Mariana Trindade, Trevor Bell , </strong><font size="3" ><font size="2"><strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong></font></font>&nbsp;2011. Changing climatic sensitivities of two spruce species across a moisture gradient in Northeastern Canada. Dendrochronologia, 29:25-30<font size="2" ><font face="Times New Roman" >.</font><br></font></font><font size=2 face=Verdana><br ></font><font size="2" face="Verdana" >This paper examines the variability in the relationship between climate and radial growth of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) and white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) trees across central Labrador, Eastern Canada. Using climate-sensitive trees, an 11-year running Pearson correlation is applied to local records to examine the relationship between radial tree growth and climate over the last 50 years and the spatial pattern in this relationship with increasing distance inland from the Labrador Sea. Results indicate that there is a high degree of instability in the climate/tree-ring sensitivity despite an overall statistically significant relationship throughout the instrumental time period (1942 to present). Although some peri- ods of reduced climate sensitivity are coincident with insect outbreaks, others cannot be explained by forest disturbance factors. Spatially, the two sites that are most representative of higher elevation areas have more time-stable climate-growth relationships than those inland or along the coast. The results also suggest that the stability of the relationship may be the result of moisture availability, rapid changes in precipitation and temperature, and site-specificity. </font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><a name=abs23></a><strong >Felicia Pickard, Andr Robichaud and Laroque, C.P.,</strong> 2011. Using dendrochronology to date the Val Comeau canoe, New Brunswick and developing an eastern white pine chronology in the Canadian Maritimes. Dendrochronologia, 29:3-8.<br ><br ></font><font size="2" face="Verdana" >This paper examines the dendrochronological analysis that was needed to establish the construction date of the Val Comeau canoe. The canoe was unearthed in northeastern New Brunswick after a large storm hit the area. It is currently housed at the New Brunswick Provincial Museum in Saint John, and had been radiocarbon dated to 440 50 years. After a scanning electron microscope analysis, the species of the canoe wood was determined to be eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.). A chronology for the white pine species was constructed for New Brunswick using living trees and structures; however, the dates did not extend far enough back in time to overlap the range of radiocarbon dates on the canoe. Another eastern white pine chronology was established for Nova Scotia which included an Acadian sluice whose chronology extended back into the radio carbon date range on the canoe. The Val Comeau canoe was successfully pattern matched against the sluice chronology and dated to a minimum cut date of 1557. Regional white pine chronologies for New Brunswick and Nova Scotia were also developed in the process which will help with future dendrochronological investigations within these regions. </font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" height="27" colspan="6"> <p align="left"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><a name=abs22></a></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><font size=2><strong>Hannah C. MacDonald, Laroque, C.P., David E.B. Fleming and Mihai R. Gherase,</strong> 2011. Dendroanalysis of metal pollution from the Sydney Steel Plant in Sydney, Nova Scotia. Dendrochronologia, 29:9-15<font size="3" face="Times New Roman">. </font><br ></font><br ></font><font size="2" face="Verdana" >Dendroanalysis of metal pollution from the Sydney Steel Plant in Sydney, Nova Scotia<br>The Sydney Steel Plant emitted toxic pollutants into the local area for almost 100 years. Although no paper record exists of the amount and spatial variability of the pollutants emitted, a natural record exists locked in the annual growth of native tree species in the region. Studies have shown that temperate trees can incorporate local metal pollution into their annual rings, creating a temporal and spatial record of the pollution. Two abundant species were sampled within a 5-km radius of the steel plant site. Using den- drochronology, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) on white birch, Betula papyrifera, and eastern larch, Larix laricina, a new methodology was developed to determine levels of pollutants in a given year. Atomic absorption spectroscopy did not produce accurate results with the small sample sizes we were able to process, but energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence determined that the hardwood birch better incorporated both lead and zinc into annual rings than the softwood larch. The technique provides an interesting area for further study, because it provides a time efficient and repeatable method of analyzing chemicals stored in wood tissue. </font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><a name=abs27></a><strong >Nishimura, P.H., and Laroque, C.P., 2010</strong>. Observed continentality in radial growth-climate relationships in a twelve site network in western Labrador, Canada. Dendrochronologia, 29:17-23.<br ></font></font></p> <p align="left"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Times-Roman','serif'; COLOR: rgb(21,21,20); FONT-SIZE: 9pt" ><font size="2" face="Verdana"><font color=#000000><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Times-Roman','serif'; COLOR: rgb(21,21,20); FONT-SIZE: 9pt" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Despite their suitability for dendroclimatological research, the boreal regions of central and western Labrador remain under-researched. In an attempt to evaluate the growth trends and climatic response of this region's trees, master chronologies have been developed for its four dominant conifer species. Balsam fir (<em>Abies balsamea</em> (L.) Mill.), white spruce (<em>Picea glauca</em> (Moench) Voss), black spruce (<em>Picea mariana</em> (Mill.) Britton, Sterns, Poggenb.) and eastern larch (<em >Larix laricina</em> (DuRoi) K. Koch) were sampled systematically within a 3<font face="WP MathA"><span lang=EN-CA>E</font></span>4<span lang="EN-CA" ><font face="WP MathA" >E</font></span> grid of twelve sites at the intersection of 62<span lang="EN-CA"><font face="WP MathA">E</font></span>W, 64<span lang="EN-CA" ><font face="WP MathA" >E</font></span>W and 66<span lang="EN-CA" ><font face="WP MathA" >E</font></span>W longitude, and latitudes 52<span lang=EN-CA><font face="WP MathA" >E</font></span>N, 53<span lang="EN-CA" ><font face="WP MathA" >E</font></span>N, 54<span lang="EN-CA" ><font face="WP MathA" >E</font></span>N and 55<span lang="EN-CA" ><font face="WP MathA" >E</font></span>N. The two most dominant species at each site were sampled, yield- ing a total of twenty-four master chronologies, all of which reflected a highly significant common signal at each site. The chronologies were subjected to a response function analysis to determine the nature of the growth-climate relationships in the region. Summer temperature proved to be the predominant limiting factor with regard to radial growth at most sites. The onset of the optimum temperature regime, however, varies across the network of sites, revealing evidence of a gradient of continentality in the data. Growth-temperature correlations indicated a significant relationship with July temperature at most east- ern sites, while western sites tended to correlate with May, June and August temperatures. Central sites tended to correlate with June-July temperatures. We interpret these results as demonstrating the biocli- matic gradient of change between coastally proximal, maritime-influenced sites and inland, continentally influenced locales. This transition occurs approximately 330 km inland from the open Labrador Sea.</font></span></font></font></span></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><a name=abs26></a><strong >Quann, S.L.,&nbsp;Young, A.B.,&nbsp;Laroque C.P.,&nbsp;Falcon-Lang, H.J., and&nbsp;Gibling, M.R.,</strong>&nbsp;2010. Dendrochronological dating of coal mine workings at Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, Canada. Atlantic Geology 46:185-194<font face="Times New Roman">.</font></font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><font face="Times New Roman"></font></font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br ></font><font size="2" face="Verdana" >Joggins, Nova Scotia, was one of the first places in North America where coal was mined. Dendrochronological methods were employed to date timber pit props preserved within relic coal mine workings on the closely adjacent Fundy and Dirty seams. These remains comprise a system of openings that represent formerly underground mines, now exposed by cliff retreat. Of the seventy-three samples collected, forty-eight were successfully cross-dated into floating chronologies and then compared against a local red spruce (Picea rubens) master chronology, thereby establishing the year in which each individual sample was cut as a live tree where bark was present. Results indicate cutting dates of 18491875, which are generally consistent with archival records of mining activity. Analysis of the 14 openings al- lows differentiation of two phases of mining. Most openings (19 and 1112 with cut dates of 18491868) represent adits driven into the cliff from the beach, and associated levels, which comprise an initial drift mine by the General Mining Association (18651871). Dendrochronological dates from trees with bark that precede the opening of this first mine suggest that timber stockpiled from the nearby Joggins Mine (opened 1847) was used in its construction. The remaining openings (10 and 1314 with cut dates of 18731875) represent a system of levels that comprise part of a later mine dug by the Joggins Coal Mining Company (18721877). Findings improve knowledge of the Joggins UNESCO World Heritage Site and help refine the regional chronology for future dendrochronological studies.</font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" height="27" colspan="6"> <p align="left"><a name=abs21></a><strong >Nishimura, P.H., and Laroque, C.P., 2010</strong>. Tree-ring evidence of larch sawfly outbreaks in western Labrador, Canada. <font face="TimesNewRoman,Italic">Canadian Journal of Forest Research<em>,</em> 40:1542-1549.</font><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br ><font face="TimesNewRoman" >&nbsp;</font></p> <p align="left"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Times-Roman','serif'; COLOR: rgb(21,21,20); FONT-SIZE: 9pt" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">As many insect outbreak reconstructions are typically based on targeted single-site sampling, researchers have often been limited in their ability to draw conclusions about regional trends as opposed to local trends in the data. The results of this paper demonstrate the value of a systematic sampling design when studying spatio-temporal processes that can vary greatly within large continuous areas of forest. Many single-site research programs have been conducted to reconstruct the history of larch sawfly (<i>Pristiphora erichsonii </i>Htg.) outbreaks in the eastern boreal region of North America. However, no such research has yet been conducted in the region of Labrador. In an attempt to illustrate the strength of a systematic gridded sampling protocol over a single-site study, we sampled a 12-site grid in western Labrador. Dominant and codominant species were sampled at each grid point, resulting in 24 master chronologies. Six eastern larch (<i>Larix laricina </i>(Du Roi) K. Koch) chronologies (host) and a regional black spruce (<i >Picea mariana </i>(Mill.) Britton, Sterns, Poggenb.) chronology (nonhost) were used to establish a hostnonhost analysis of past sawfly outbreaks on a regional scale. Both re- gional and localized larch sawfly outbreaks were identified, but in general, larch sawfly outbreaks in western Labrador appeared to be spatially synchronous and regional in scale.</font></span></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana" ></font>&nbsp;</p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><a name=abs20></a><strong >M. Trindade and Laroque, C.P.,</strong>&nbsp;2009. Multidisciplinary applications of tree-ring analysis in Newfoundland and Labrador.&nbsp; Ktaqamkuk (Irish Journal of Newfoundland and Labrador Studies), 1: 126-143.<br><br ></font><font size="2" face="Verdana" >We describe the potential for using many types of tree-ring analyses with particular reference to their application to Newfoundland and Labrador issues. Tree-ring analysis is an inexpensive, non-destructive method of studying a variety of living and dead trees and wooden objects. The adaptability of tree-ring analysis to many sub-disciplines renders this science useful for a number of different methodologies, with the results quickly applied to various interest groups throughout the province. Here, we discuss simple applications of tree-ring analysis to climate change scenarios, the power generation industry, forest ecology and management, parks and tourism, cultural heritage, and history across the province.</font><font size="2" face="Verdana" ><br >&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;We also present an innovative tree-ring sampling strategy that has been established across Newfoundland and Labrador. The sampling grid consists of sampling tree species along lines of 1? latitude and 1? longitude across Newfoundland, and 1? latitude and 2? longitude across the majority of Labrador. This grid is the first of its kind in Canada and will provide the means of exploring spatial characteristics of issues that are particularly significant to Newfoundland and Labrador. We illustrate this through tree-ring analysis and the use of our established grid system, there can be many benefits to Newfoundland and Labrador economic and cultural developments. </font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" height="27" colspan="6"> <p align="left"><font size="2"><a name=abs19></a><strong >Robichaud, A., and</strong> <strong >Laroque, C.P.,</strong> <strong >2008</strong>. Dendroarchaeology in southwestern Nova Scotia<font size="3"> </font>and the construction of a regional red spruce chronology. Tree-Ring Research, 64(1): 17-<font size="3" face="Times New Roman"><font size="2" face="Verdana" >25</font>.&nbsp;</font> </font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br ></font><font size="2" face="Verdana" >Dendrochronology studies in Atlantic Canada are rare partly because old-growth forests are scarce making it difficult to establish multiple-century tree-ring chronologies. One approach to overcome this problem is to use tree-ring records found in the wood of historical structures. For our study, the Sinclair Inn in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, was selected for a dendroarchaeological assessment because of its rich and complex history: it resulted from the merging of two early 18th century houses (the Soullard and Skene houses). To date the Sinclair Inn, three other historical structures of a younger age were used to establish an annual ring record in lieu of old-growth forest data. Red spruce (Picea rubens), a dominant tree species in the Maritimes, was the most prominent wood found in the structures and allowed for the creation of a regional red spruce reference chronology extending far enough in the past to cover the supposed period of construction of the Sinclair Inn. Crossdating results indicate cutting dates of 1709 and 1710 for the Skene and Soullard houses respectively, and of 1769 for the inn itself. In the process of dating the structure, a ~200-year old regional floating red spruce chronology (1591-1789) was developed that will further help future dendrochronological investigations in the Maritimes.<br ></font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><a name=abs18></a><strong >Selig, N., Laroque, C.P., and Marsh, S., 2007</strong>. Dendroarchaeological investigations in the Maritimes: A case study of Dorchester House, New Brunswick. Material Culture Review, 66:42-49. </font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana" >This paper describes a method that allows social scientists to discern, with annual and even subannual precision, the construction dates of structures of historic value. The assignment of construction dates is seen as an instrumental starting point when historical investigators are researching individual buildings. By utilizing dendroarchaeological methods (tree-ring analysis), questions concerning when a structure was built, and who originally built or had the structure built, can be greatly illuminated. Dorchester House is one such example in New Brunswick. Description of the procedures to dendroarchaeologically date the structure are described and the initial date of construction (1821) and subsequent renovations (1859) are put in a better historical context once these dates are ascertained. The complex history of the area and the original lot is put into a much clearer timeline once the two dates are assigned to different sections of the house. The vast array of historical sources that relate to the property assessments and census records can be much more selectively filtered to describe with a higher probability the actual historical facts surrounding Dorchester House. The methods, although not new, could greatly assist research on the many other historical wooden structures in Atlantic Canada and elsewhere that have assumed and/or controversial dates of construction, and that are vulnerable to being lost through fire, demolition, or decomposition. This study highlights the underutilization of dendroarchaeological methods in Canada, and illustrates the utility it has to offer to many historical questions. </font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs17"></a></b></font><font size=2 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><b >Campbell, L.J.,</b>, <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >and Laroque, C.P.,, 2007.</span> Decay progression and classification in two old-growth forests in Atlantic Canada. Forest Ecology and Management, 238: 293-301. </font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana" >This paper investigates the relationship between visually apparent stage of decay of coarse woody debris (CWD) and time since death of decaying balsam fir (Abies balsamea L.) and black spruce (Picea mariana [P. Mill]) in old-growth forests in western Newfoundland and in the Cape Breton Highlands (CBH) of Nova Scotia. These sites are two of the least disturbed old-growth forest locations remaining in Atlantic Canada. In Newfoundland, a total of 42 detrital samples were collected from downed logs and standing snags, of which 36 had their mortality dates determined. In the CBH, 50 detrital samples were collected, of which death dates for 44 samples were obtained. For both sites, samples represented all visually discernable classes of decay. In Newfoundland, these visual decay classes were separated by approximately 17 years for a minimum decay time of 85 years. In CBH, a faster rate of decomposition was apparent, with 12-year classes and a minimum decay time of logs of 60 years. Evidence points toward a climate-driven decay regime in both locations, with the longer time frame evident in Newfoundland thought to result from lower temperatures and fewer snow-free days than in CBH. </font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs16"></a></b></font><font size=2 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><b >Laroque, C.P.</b>, <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >and Smith, D.J., 2005</span>. Predicted short-term radial-growth changes of trees based on past climate on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Dendrochronologia, 22: 163-168.</font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana" >Biologically-based deterministic multiple regression models are developed to investigate the consequences of future climates on the radial growth response of five high-elevation conifer species on Vancouver Island.&nbsp; Historical climate data and tree ring chronologies are used to establish robust relationships between climate and radial growth. Coupled General Circulation Modelled (CGCM) outputs are then used to provide monthly predictions of future climates from 2000 to 2100 AD. The established historical relationships are projected into the future using the CGCM data to predict radial growth.&nbsp; Results indicate that each species will react individually to predicted changes in climate, with no one dominant radial growth trend established. The most radical changes in the radial-growth behaviour occur within mountain hemlock&nbsp; (Tsuga mertensiana) trees that have adapted to survive in deep snowpack environments, a condition that future predictions highlight as the most susceptible to change.</font> </p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs1"></a></b></font><font size=2 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" ><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><b >Bachrach, T., Jakobsen, K., Kinney, J., Nishimura, P., Reyes, A., Laroque, C.P., and Smith, D.J.,</b> </font><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">2004</span>. Dendrogeomorphological assessment of movement at Hilda rock glacier, Banff National Park, Canadian Rocky Mountains. Geografiska Annaler A, 86A(1): 1-9.</font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><font size=2 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" >The results of this dendrogeomorphological study provide evidence of the active movement of Hilda rock glacier, a tongue-shaped rock glacier in the Columbia Icefield region of Banff National Park. Cross-sectional samples were cut from 44 detrital subalpine fir (<span style="FONT-STYLE: italic">Abies lasiocarpa</span> (Hook.) Nutt.) and Engelmann spruce (<span style="FONT-STYLE: italic">Picea engelmannii</span> Parry) boles killed and buried by debris spilling off the steep distal slope of the rock glacier. The samples were crossdated using locally and regionally developed tree-ring chronologies, and were shown to have been killed between 1576 and 1999. Our results show that Hilda rock glacier has advanced at an average rate of 1.62 cm/year since the late 1790s, with limited evidence of similar rates of activity extending back to the mid-1570s. This rock glacier activity is believed linked to persistent periglacial processes that appear to be independent of the climatic forcing mechanisms known to influence glacier mass balances over the same interval.</font></font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" height="27" colspan="6"> <p align="left">&nbsp;</p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" ></font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><font size=2 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><b ><a name="abs12"></a>Laroque, C.P., and Smith, D.J.</b>, <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold" >2003</span>. Radial-growth forecasts for five high-elevation conifer species on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Forest Ecology and Management 183: 313-325. <br><br >Biologically-based deterministic multiple regression models are developed to investigate the consequences of future climates on the radial growth response of five high-elevation conifer species on Vancouver Island. Historical climate data and tree ring chronologies are used to establish robust relationships between climate and radial growth. Coupled General Circulation Modelled (CGCM) outputs are then used to provide monthly predictions of future climates from 2000 to 2100 AD. The established historical relationships are projected into the future using the CGCM data to predict radial growth. Results indicate that each species will react individually to predicted changes in climate, with no one dominant radial growth trend established. The most radical changes in the radial-growth behaviour occur within mountain hemlock trees that have adapted to survive in deep snowpack environments, a condition that future predictions highlight as the most susceptible to change.</font></font></p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"></font> <p align="right"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><a href="#top" >Back to Top</a> </font></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs11"></a></b></font><font size=2 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><b >Laroque, C.P., Lewis, D.H., and Smith, D. J., 2000/01</b>. Treeline dynamics on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Western Geography, 10/11: 43-63.<br><br >This paper describes the nature of treeline dynamics and upper-elevation tree establishment patterns on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. We examined tree growth, climate and seedling relationships at three upper-elevation locations using standard dendroecological approaches. Our data suggest that this habitat has experienced species-specific pulses of tree establishment that have had a major impact on the character of the local treeline boundaries. The stem data collected within quadrats at Gemini Mountain and Haley Bowl show that seedling establishment within the last three centuries was episodic and linked to historical climatic patterns. Successful mountain hemlock establishment in this setting is restricted to periods characterized by either cool summers and shallow winter snowpacks, or warmer than normal summers and moderately deep snowpacks. The establishment of amabilis and subalpine fir seedlings appears restricted to intervals with cool growing seasons and moderately deep seasonal snowpacks. Episodic seedling establishment in the 20th century has resulted in a gradual infilling of the local treeline and the development of a more structured parkland belt that is expected to have habitat implications for endangered Vancouver Island marmot.</font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs2"></a>Kellner, A.E., Laroque, C.P., Smith, D.J., and Harestad, A.S., 2000</b>. Chronological dating of high-elevation dead and dying trees on Northern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Northwest Science, 74: 242-247.<br ><br>We analysed tree rings to determine the time of death for 18 moribund and dead trees used as roosts by bats on northern Vancouver Island. We crossdated 29 increment core samples with tree-ring chronologies of living trees to estimate when the trees died. After they die, yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) trees deteriorate slowly and remain standing for as long as 200 years. In contrast, few western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) and western white pine (Pinus monticola) snags persist longer than 100 years. The ages at which our sampled trees died were highly variable, with western white pine, western hemlock, and yellow-cedar exhibiting the narrowest to widest range of ages, respectively. Our findings highlight the long persistence of snags in high-elevation coastal forests and the centuries of ecological service that these trees provide to snag-dependent wildlife.</font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs3"></a>Carter, R., LeRoy, S., Nelson, T., Laroque, C.P., and Smith, D.J., 1999</b>. Dendroglaciological investigations at Hilda Creek rock glacier, Banff National Park, Canadian Rocky Mountains. Gographie physique et Quaternaire, 53: 365-371. <br>Dendroglaciological techniques are used to provide evidence of historical rock glacier activity at Hilda Creek rock glacier in the Canadian Rockies. The research focuses on the sedimentary apron of the outermost morainal deposit, where excavations in 1997 uncovered six buried tree boles that had been pushed over and entombed by distally spilled debris. Cross-sectional samples crossdated with a local Engelmann spruce tree-ring chronology were shown to have been killed sometime after 1856. Based on the extent of the excavation, the data indicates that Hilda Creek rock glacier has continued to advance along the present ground surface at a rate exceeding 1 cm/year.</font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" height="27" colspan="6"> <p align="right"></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><b ><a name="abs4"></a>Laroque, C.P., and Smith, D.J., 1999</b>. Tree-ring analysis of yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 29: 115-123. <br ><br>Yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) are the oldest known coniferous trees in Canada. This paper reports on the first dendrochronological investigation of yellow-cedar trees at montane sites on Vancouver Island. Mature yellow-cedar trees were selected for study at four sites along a 200-km northwest-southeast transect. Trees older than 500 years were common at three of the four sites, with numerous individuals older than 750 years identified. Carefully prepared cores proved well suited for ring-width measurement, with 220 cores from 156 trees included in our final four chronologies. The best replicated segment of the four chronologies (1800-1994 A.D.) show common intervals of reduced radial growth in the 1800s, 1840s, 1860s, 1920s, 1950s, and 1970s. While the relative strength of the between-site signals varies over this interval (r = 0.424 to 0.908), it is apparent that the chronologies share a common radial growth signal. Our efforts to identify the role climate played in this relationship were successful and the results appear to have a dendroecological basis within the annual yellow-cedar growth cycle. Six different temperature and precipitation variables explain 61% of the annual ring width variance. Our results suggest that further dendrochronological and dendroclimatological studies using this long-lived species are warranted.</font></p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"></font> <p align="right"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br ><a href="#top" >Back to Top</a> </font></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs5"></a>Smith, D.J., and Laroque, C.P., 1998</b>. Mountain hemlock growth dynamics on Vancouver Island. Northwest Science, 72 (Special Issue 2): 67-70. <br ><br>Mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana [Bong.] Carr.) trees are a major component of the mountain hemlock biogeoclimatic zone in coastal mountains of British Columbia. These stands are under increasing pressure as timber harvesting extends upwards into the montane, and their successful management requires an understanding of how they will respond to future climatic changes. Previous research showed that climatic changes in the 20th century have initiated enhanced radial growth rates within mountain hemlock stands and resulted in invasions of subalpine meadows throughout the region. While these historical climatic changes appear as beneficial to mountain hemlock populations, there is some concern that if the climate warms as hypothesized, the productivity of mountain hemlock stands may be compromised by a restriction in habitat and regeneration capacity.</font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs6"></a>Smith, D.J., and Laroque, C.P., 1998</b>. High-elevation dendroclimatic records from Vancouver Island. In: Decoding Canadas Past: Climate Variations and Biodiversity Change During the Last Millennium. MacIver, D.C. and Meyer, R.E. (eds.). Atmospheric and Environment Services, Downsview, Ontario, 33-44.<br><br>This paper summarizes research designed to describe the radial growth response of high-elevation stands of co-occurring mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) and yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) to historical climatic fluctuations. Our findings are based on an assessment of annual growth at timberline sites on Vancouver Island extending 175 km southward from Mt. Cain to Heather Mountain in the Cowichan Lake area. The growth trends of both species show synchronous patterns that potentially provide the basis for regional crossdating. Based on these preliminary interpretations, it is concluded there is considerable potential for high-resolution paleoenvironmental reconstruction on Vancouver Island using dendroclimatological research techniques. </font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" >Back to Top</a> </p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs7"></a>Smith, D.J., and Laroque, C.P., 1996</b>. Dendroglaciological dating of a Little Ice Age glacial advance at Moving Glacier, Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Gographie physique et Quaternaire, 50: 47-55. <br><br >Dendrochronological investigations at Moving Glacier provide the first calendar-dating of a Little Ice Age glacier advance on Vancouver Island. In 1931, Moving Glacier was within 30 to 50 m of a distinct trimline and terminal moraine marking its maximum Little Ice Age extent. A reconnaissance of the site in 1993 revealed the presence of sheared in situ stumps and detrital trunks inside the 1931 ice limit. Sampling in 1994 showed the site was covered a mature subalpine forest prior to the glacial advance which overrode the site after 1718 A.D. Following this period of expansion, which saw Moving Glacier expand to its maximum Little Ice Age position after 1818 A.D., the glacier apparently experienced only minimal retreat prior to first being photographed in 1931. </font></p> <p align="right"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><a href="#top" >Back to Top</a> </font></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs8"></a>Denton, J.J., Laroque, C.P., Williams, A.E., and Wilson, P.J., 1995</b>. Proglacial sedimentation in the Loss Creek valley, southwestern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Western Geography, 5: 1-12. <br><br >A stratigraphic study was conducted on an exposure located in the lower reaches of Loss Creek on Vancouver Island. Four areas were identified in the 72 m high exposure. The lowest unit is composed of 17 m of laminated clays (Unit 1). The next exposure is a 3 m bed of poorly-sorted sand and gravel with a-b planes dipping toward the valley floor (slumped deposit). These are overlain by 37 m of sand and silt rhythmites (Unit 2), followed by 15 m of trough cross-bedded, coarse sands and gravels, with the beds oriented east to west (Unit 3). The coarsening-upwards sequence is interpreted as a proglacial deposit of lacustrine clays, outwash sands, and braided stream gravels, partly buried by a post-depositional slump. Other deposits at lower elevations and up-valley suggest the area is characterized by a complicated sequence of alternating clay, sand, and gravel layers. </font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">These results do not support past research indicating that a single post-Vashon maximum resurgence of the Juan de Fuca ice lobe formed a 460 m ice dam at the mouth of Loss Creek. It seems more likely that the region experienced multiple sequences of advance and retreat phases. Further research is necessary to fully decipher the complex glacial history of this area.</font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" ><font size="2" face="Verdana">Back to Top</font> </a></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs9"></a>Lawby, C.P., Smith, D.J, Laroque, C.P., and Brugman, M.M., 1995</b>. Glaciological studies at Rae Glacier, Canadian Rocky Mountains. Physical Geography, 15: 425-441. <br><br>Rae Glacier is a small cirque glacier located in the front ranges of the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Between 1990 and 1991 field research was completed to describe the physical glaciology of Rae Glacier and to characterize historical glaciological trends at the site. Ablation and surface movement rates were measured using a network of stakes drilled into the glacier and radio-echo sounding was used to describe local ice depths. </font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Rae Glacier has experienced a significant loss in size and mass during the historical period due to a lengthy interval of negative mass balance conditions. The glacier has decreased in surface area by over 50% and now contains less than 25% of the ice it did at the end of the last century. </font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Surface ice velocity varied between 1.4-5.4 m in 1990 to 1991. Rates of ice ablation proved to be highly variable, with steeper areas showing up to 50% more ablation. Combined with data on the emergent flow component of the glacier, the ablation data suggest the glacier is presently unable to replenish the amount of ice annually being lost to ablation. The glacier has a lag time of between five to ten years which confirms it is sensitive to climatic fluctuations and responds to changes in mass balance within a very short time. This observation is supported by an estimated response time of 42 years.</font></p> <p align="right"><a href="#top" >Back to Top</a> </p></td></tr> <tr> <td><strong >Abstracts for Theses </strong></font></div> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><b ><a name="abs14"></a>Laroque, C.P., 2002</b>. Dendroclimatic Response of High-Elevation Conifers, Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, 213p. <br><br >The aim of this research program was to examine the growth response of high-elevation conifers on Vancouver Island to past, present and future climates. Forty locations were sampled and 88 chronologies were used to describe radial-growth changes over time and space. Radial-growth trends have been similar across Vancouver Island for most of the past 500 years. Large-scale oceanic influences on climate were shown to be strong forcing mechanisms to radial growth. Master chronologies were constructed for each of the five tree species examined: mountain hemlock, Tsuga mertensiana (Bong.) Carr., yellow-cedar, Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (D. Don) Spach, western hemlock, Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg., Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, and western red-cedar, Thuja plicata Donn. The responses of these species to climate were combined to develop multiple aggregate chronologies (MACs). The MACs are able to record a stronger relationship to climate than all but the best single-species chronologies, with relationships to seasonalized parameters improved to a greater degree than those of single-month variables. </font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Using these MAC relationships, proxy information was derived for four climate parameters (April 1 snowpack depth, June-July temperature, July temperature, July precipitation). The explained variance of the models was higher in the two seasonal reconstructions (April 1 snowpack depth r2 = 41 %, June-July temperature r2 = 34 %) than for individual monthly reconstructions (July precipitation r2 = 15 %, July temperature r2 = 24 %). A wavelet analysis showed that each of the four models contains dominant modes of variability throughout time at approximately 16, 32, 65 and 130-150 year periods. Each mode of variability seems to be linked to ocean forcing mechanisms. </font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" >Climate/radial-growth relationships were used to predict radial growth under various future climate scenarios. TREE (Tree-ring Radial Expansion Estimator) was developed to present an interactive, internet-based radial-growth model, which calculates the short-term radial-growth response for each tree species to user-defined climate change scenarios. Long-term radial-growth responses were produced using data from general circulation models to develop relationships that predict future radial growth of each tree species. These predictions highlight which species are susceptible to future shifts in climate and indicate which climate parameters may drive changes in radial growth. </font></p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" ></font> <p align="right"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br ><a href="#top" >Back to Top</a> </font></p></td></tr> <tr> <td><b ><a name="abs15"></a>Laroque, C.P., 1995</b>. The Dendrochronology and Dendroclimatology of Yellow-cedar on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. M.Sc. Thesis, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, 104p.<br><br >The purpose of this study was to investigate the dendrochronological and dendroclimatological potential of yellow-cedar in the Pacific Northwest of North America. A primary objective was to establish whether the growth response of yellow-cedar is sensitive to climate fluctuations. Once it was determined that yellow-cedar was inherently sensitive, further dendroclimatological investigations were attempted. </font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Trees were sampled at five sites between latitudes 50? and 51? on Vancouver Island. A total of 380 increment cores were collected in the summer of 1994. The samples were subsequently visually cross-dated, prior to ring-width measurement. Site indices were created and the five sites revealed a strong visual and statistical similarity. A regional index was constructed that represents the oldest living chronology for tree growth in Canada. </font></p> <p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">A response function analysis was initiated to determine the significant climatic parameters to ring growth. This analysis identified previous August temperature as the variable most likely to influence variation in ring width. This variable was used to estimate current August temperature and associated parameters. The chronologies were compared to other relevant research on Vancouver Island and a common climate signal was apparent.</font></p> <p align="right"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><a href="#top" >Back to Top</a> </font></p></td></tr></p></tbody></table><br> <table style="TEXT-ALIGN: left; WIDTH: 640px; MARGIN-LEFT: auto; MARGIN-RIGHT: auto" border=0> <tbody> <tr align="center"> <td> <div align="center"><font color="#666666" size="-3" face="verdana, Geneva, Arial">Maintained by <a href="mailto:Colin.laroque@usask.ca" > Colin P. Laroque </a></font></div> <div align="center"><font color="#666666" size="-3" face="verdana, Geneva, Arial">Last updated March 13, 2014 </font></div></td></tr></tbody></table></center> </body></html>