FMD virus

Glossary



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Artiodactyl
: even-toed ungulates (hooved animals).

Containment Level 4 is the highest level of containment and represents an isolated unit that is completely self-contained to function independently. Facilities are highly specialized, secure with an air lock for entry and exit, Class III biological safety cabinets or positive pressure ventilated suits, and a separate ventilation system with full controls to contain contamination. Only fully trained and authorised personnel may enter the Level 4 containment laboratory. On exit from the area, personnel will shower and re-dress in street clothing. All manipulations with agents must be performed in Class III biological safety cabinets or in conjunction with one-piece, positive-pressure-ventilated suits. Public Heath Agency of Canda. Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines , 3rd Edition 2004.

Epizootic: an epidemic outbreak of disease in an animal population with the implication that it may extend to humans.

FMD:
Foot and Mouth Disease.

FMDV: Foot and Mouth Disease Virus

OIE:
Office International des Epizooties

Risk Group 4 infectious agents are pathogens that usually produce very serious human or animal disease, often untreatable, and may be readily transmitted from one individual to another, from animal to human or vice-versa directly or indirectly, by casual contact (high individual risk, high community risk).  Examples include Ebola viruses, Herpes B virus (Monkey virus), Foot and Mouth Disease.

Probang cup  is "a metal cup, about 3 cm diameter and 5 cm deep, with a slightly sharpened edge, attached to a curved metal wire, about 50-60 cm long, with a handle at the far end. This can be pushed into the mouth of an animal, over the base of the tongue, into the pharynx, and is then pulled out again, collecting superficial cellular material and mucus from the pharynx).


Underunning: separation of horn around heel, sole, toe and finally to the outside hoof wall.  In pigs, the complete horn of the toe may be lost. Cattle and deer may also lose one or both horns of the foot.





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Created September 2010
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